Attention Deficit Site Offers Wealth of Data

By Szadkowski, Joseph | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 27, 2000 | Go to article overview

Attention Deficit Site Offers Wealth of Data


Szadkowski, Joseph, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Visitors who read the "ABC's of ADD" on the Attention Deficit Disorder Association's Web site will learn that one in 20 Americans has attention deficit disorder or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Furthermore, almost two-thirds of children with ADHD will continue to have significant problems with symptoms and behavior as adults, affecting their lives, work, family and social relationships.

Knowledge about these disorders has grown, and the ADDA Web site is the perfect place to start learning about this sometimes emotionally crippling neurological problem.

THE ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER ASSOCIATION

SITE ADDRESS: www.add.org

CREATOR: The Attention Deficit Disorder Association is a nonprofit organization located in Highland Park, Ill. The group focuses on the needs of people with ADD.

CREATOR QUOTABLE: "We created the Web site to provide accurate and easily accessible information about attention deficit disorders to the general public, health care professionals, educators and members of the media," says Peter Jaksa, president of ADDA.

WORD FROM THE WEBWISE: ADD and ADHD have nothing to do with poor parenting, uncaring teachers or constant television viewing. The disorders most likely are caused by biological factors stemming from genetics. The person with ADD or ADHD exhibits a poor attention span and perhaps excessive activity and may have physical restlessness and impulsiveness. Treatments available include medication, behavior and cognitive therapy and help developing coping skills.

Visitors to this informative site will learn that ADD and ADHD are recognized as disabilities under federal legislation, including the Americans With Disabilities Act.

The site includes information on current ADD research and offers basic articles such as, "What Causes ADD?" This article, credited to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Public Health Service, the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Mental Health, will help ease the minds of anxious parents who have been told their child has ADD or ADHD.

For parents, teachers and employers, the "ADD Treatment" section gives an update on the medication being used to treat ADD and articles exploring myths and facts about ADD and its treatment and how to deal with ADD behaviors in the classroom. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Attention Deficit Site Offers Wealth of Data
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.