Remembering in Black and White

By williams, patricia J. | The Nation, February 28, 2000 | Go to article overview

Remembering in Black and White


williams, patricia J., The Nation


It may be my imagination, but this year Black History Month has seemed to present a more complicated range of memorials than in the recent past. For one thing, there seem to have been fewer broadcasts of Martin Luther King Jr.'s rising tremolo in the penultimate moments of his "I have a dream" speech. In an odd way, I think that's a good thing. While it's a speech that automatically brings me to tears, it's also true that it has been overdeployed to the point of cliche. The yearly ritual of celebrating black history through a sixty-second soundbite of Dr. King's most famous address flattens the great complexity of African-American history. Indeed, in his new book, I May Not Get There With You, DePaul professor Michael Eric Dyson has gone so far as to recommend a moratorium on playing the "I have a dream" speech, precisely because he thinks its ubiquity masks the complex and deeply challenging remainder of King's work, including his withering critiques of capitalism and ardent support of affirmative action.

One of the shifts in mood this year is attributable to the fact that after years of denial, the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation just published its conclusion that Thomas Jefferson very likely fathered not one but all six of Sally Hemings's children. The most direct result of this development is that the family burial plot is now free at last to receive the remains of Hemings's descendants-many of whom lived or are living as white people. The more general result has been a popular rush to romanticize this history, typified by a CBS miniseries in which Hemings is depicted as an irresistibly saucy, seductive, choice-making agent who quotes Thomas Paine, Shakespeare and the Declaration of Independence even in the wake of her childhood sweetheart's lynching.

This month has also brought us the report of a commission in Oklahoma concerning the 1921 white race riot in which Tulsa's black community was bombed and burned to the ground. It concludes that hundreds more probably died than are accounted for in the official tally, and that the attack was sanctioned by the city's most prominent public figures. An effort to locate a hidden mass grave is under way, assisted by the recollection of a white witness, then a 10-year-old boy, who remembers peeking into wooden crates in which multiple black bodies lay heaped. The findings have fueled fierce new debates in Tulsa between those who desire reparations and those who want to let bygones be bygones.

In the academic arena, there is a series of new books examining what the concept of "whiteness" both hides and reveals. I am glad to see this development, for I think it is good that our inquiry include not just black but white progress in race relations. One of my favorites is White Lies: Race and the Myths of Whiteness, by cultural critic Maurice Berger. Berger begins from a painful and quite intimate perspective, reflecting upon how his immigrant family became assimilated as white. He describes the racial ambivalence of his mother, a Sephardic Jew who was ashamed of her own dark skin and curly hair. …

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