U.S. Seeks Changes to Accept International Criminal Court

By Pisik, Betsy | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 26, 1999 | Go to article overview

U.S. Seeks Changes to Accept International Criminal Court


Pisik, Betsy, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


NEW YORK - American negotiators say they still hope to sign onto a proposed international criminal court but only if foreign diplomats agree to several key provisions to make the court more palatable to Washington.

The U.S. delegation pressed its case in closed-door meetings during a two-week international conference that concludes today.

Washington wants to see safeguards that would protect American troops serving overseas from political or frivolous prosecutions.

"We're doing our best to see if these fundamental concerns can be addressed," said David Scheffer, the State Department lawyer who has negotiated criminal court issues for more than three years.

"If they can, then we're in a much better position to consider supporting the treaty."

The court will hear allegations of war crimes, genocide and crimes against humanity.

The treaty to create the court has been endorsed in principle by 75 nations and will enter into force with 60 ratifications.

Although the Hague-based tribunal will only hear the most grievous accusations, its jurisdiction will be universal, extending even to governments that have not chosen to join it.

For this reason, American officials have made it clear to allies around the world that key aspects of the treaty must be changed or the United States will actively work against it.

Specifically, the United States objects to the court's universal jurisdiction, which exceeds the scope of nearly every other international agreement and which Washington claims is in violation of accepted international laws.

Mr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

U.S. Seeks Changes to Accept International Criminal Court
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.