Public Economics


Members of the NBER's Public Economics Program met April 4-5 in Cambridge. Program Director Raj Chetty of Harvard University, Research Associate John N. Friedman of Brown University, and Faculty Research Fellow Eric Zwick of the University of Chicago organized the meeting. These researchers' papers were presented and discussed:

* Francois Gerard, Columbia University and NBER, and Joana Naritomi, London School of Economics, "Job Displacement Insurance and (the Lack of) Consumption-Smoothing"

* Jacob Bastian, University of Chicago, and Maggie R. Jones, U.S. Census Bureau, "Do EITC Expansions Pay for Themselves? Effects on Tax Revenue and Public Assistance Spending"

* Tatiana Homonoff, New York University, and Jason Somerville, Cornell University, "Program Recertification Costs: Evidence from SNAP"

* Victor Stango, University of California, Davis, and Jonathan Zinman, Dartmouth College and NBER, "We Are All Behavioral, More or Less: Measuring and Using Consumer-level Behavioral Sufficient Statistics" (NBER Working Paper No. 25540)

* Rebecca Diamond and Petra Persson, Stanford University and NBER; Michael J. Dickstein, New York University and NBER; and Timothy McQuade, Stanford University, "Take-Up, Drop-Out, and Spending in ACA Marketplaces" (NBER Working Paper No. 24668)

* Shifrah Aron-Dine, Stanford University; Aditya Aladangady, David Cashin, Wendy Dunn, Laura Feiveson, Paul Lengermann, and Claudia R. Sahm, Federal Reserve Board; and Katherine Richard, University of Michigan, "High-frequency Spending Responses to the Earned Income Tax Credit "

* Paul Hufe, Ifo Institute for Economic Research; Ravi Kanbur, Cornell University; and Andreas Peichl, University of Munich, "Measuring Unfair Inequality: Reconciling Equality of Opportunity and Freedom from Poverty"

* Bruce D. …

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Public Economics
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