Mum's Intuition Diagnosed Son's Brain Tumour; SCAN PROVED PARENT'S WORST FEARS CORRECT

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), September 10, 2019 | Go to article overview

Mum's Intuition Diagnosed Son's Brain Tumour; SCAN PROVED PARENT'S WORST FEARS CORRECT


Byline: JEZ HEMMING Daily Post Reporter jez.hemming@reachplc.com

A MOTHER diagnosed her son's brain tumour before medics.

Mum of five Catherine Kelly intuitively knew something was seriously wrong with young Edward, three.

Mrs Kelly and her husband Shaun, from Holywell, Flintshire, realised something was wrong at the end of summer 2018 when Edward started bumping into furniture and door frames. His balance became poor and he started shuffling down stairs on his backside.

When the couple noticed his younger sister Edith beginning to overtake him developmentally, Mrs Kelly suspected he might have a brain tumour, although at first paediatricians disagreed.

She said: "I said I wanted to get a credit card and pay privately to get him tested. I looked up some of the symptoms and with a brain tumour you be sleeping better but wouldn't go to sleep.

should ut he ut e "His walking was bad but the paediatrician said he had no neurological symptoms of a tumour."

After Mrs Kelly persisted, doctors booked Edward in for a nonurgent MRI scan on November 18 last year.

y ht at ospital In the meantime they sent the toddler for an ophthalmology appointment Rhyl's Royal Alexandra Hospital on Mrs Kelly's birthday.

behind RI scan Octod She said: "The ophthalmologist said he saw swelling Edward's eyes - so the MRI was brought forward to October 31.

"He had the scan and they sent the images straight to Alder Hey to check over."

" It turned out he had a massive medulla blastoma tumour in the centre of his brain. Mrs Kelly-uder and Edward were immediately rushed by ambulance to Liverpool's Alder Hey Children's Hospital.

She added: "I was terrified.

rrified.

Shaun had to come home because the other children were in after-school club. I literally had to go in the ambulance with what we had with us.

"What calmed me was seeing the surgeon Conor Mallucci, the paediatric consultant neurosurgeon in Alder Hey. He was incredibly matter-of-fact."

Mr Kelly added: "I broke down in tears in the car park for a second, then got my head into gear and arranged childcare for the next day.

"I was over at Alder Hey in the morning. That's when I felt very reassured by Mr Mallucci. He said, 'This is what we do.'.

* "I asked, 'Is my boy coming back?'. He said, 'Yes.'"."

The couple had total confidence in the hospital and staff and 98% of the tumour was removed during a 12-hour operation the following day.

It was an aggressive, highgrade growth and the remainder needed intensive chemotherapy to defeat it.

However, Edward suffered a seizure and developed hydrocephalus-like symptoms due to the massive amount of fluids he needed to flush out the chemicals from the treatment. "He had surgery to have a shunt fitted in his head to drain off the fluid," said Mrs Kelly.

"That failed within 24 hours, so it had to be repaired. Then he contracted an infection because his immune system was so depleted."

Mr Kelly, 45, a telecoms engineer, said: "Edward went blind for 36 hours. …

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