Reflections

By Sipiora, Phillip | The Mailer Review, Fall 2017 | Go to article overview

Reflections


Sipiora, Phillip, The Mailer Review


This year marks Volume 11 of Review. As many of our readers know, the production of this issue has been exceptionally challenging as we experienced significant delays beyond our control. However, we are back on track and Volume 12 is scheduled to be published this October.

The future continues to burn brightly in Mailer Studies and popular and scholarly interest in the life and work of Norman Mailer continues to be vibrant. Perhaps the strongest indication of the escalating interest in Mailer's literary and discursive work was the decision by The Library of America to include Norman Mailer in their register of essential works in America. The LoA launch, in 2018, includes a boxed set of two volumes, The 1960s Collection, and both volumes were edited by J. Michael Lennon. The collector's set is densely packed: Volume One: Four Books of the 1960s includes An American Dream, Why Are We in Vietnam?, The Armies of the Night, and Miami and Miami and the Siege of Chicago. The second inclusion, Volume Two: Collected Essays of the 1960s, includes a wide swath range of Mailer's discursive writing in a critical decade of intellectual, social, and cultural growth for Mailer rising

The dissemination of Mailer resources continues apace as new research tools, insightful analysis, and archival texts emerge from Mailer's vast, diverse lifetime oeuvre of creativity. In 2018, J. Michael Lennon, Donna Pedro Lennon, and Gerald Lucas (editor) published a new, significantly revised, enhanced edition of Works and Days, an exhaustive compendium of source materials for Mailer's vast, prodigious output, beginning in the 1940s. …

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