Pause for Midyear Program Evaluation

By Huber, Kim | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 7, 2000 | Go to article overview

Pause for Midyear Program Evaluation


Huber, Kim, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Can you believe the school year is half over? I can't. Are you happy with the year so far, or does your school program need improvement?

If you're happy, that's great. But what if you are not satisfied? What if you say, "Things need to change." Maybe it's time for a midyear evaluation.

Taking time to evaluate your home education program can greatly improve not only your child's academic progress, but also your overall outlook on the school year. Let's look at four key areas - discipline, obedience, motivation and priority - and see how assessing each one can bring new life to your home school.

The first area is personal discipline. As parents and teachers, we have a responsibility to instruct our children in discipline for their everyday and academic lives.

I am not naturally a morning person. I would rather stay up late into the night than get up early in the morning, but I know my day will be more profitable if I rise early. Knowing this, I discipline myself to get up, even if it is still dark outside, and prepare for the day ahead.

As dads and moms, we need to remember that our children are watching us constantly. Let them see you exercising personal discipline in your life, and they more than likely will follow your example. Let's face it, home-schooling takes discipline and work. Our children are not always going to feel like opening their books. When we require personal discipline, they not only will be able to finish their studies, but also will be strengthened in character. They need to learn that any task they would rather not tackle will take personal discipline to complete.

The second area, obedience, is where your child sees you as the rightful authority figure in his or her life and is obedient to your instructions. If you do not have or maintain proper authority, you will find yourself in a constant power struggle. Instead of making progress through your home-education program, you always will be fighting to maintain control and order in your home. Where personal discipline and obedience are absent, home-schooling will be difficult, and in some instances impossible.

The third area to evaluate is motivation. …

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