Helping Hand Ad Focuses on Halifax's Community Role

By Reynolds, Emma | Marketing, February 24, 2000 | Go to article overview

Helping Hand Ad Focuses on Halifax's Community Role


Reynolds, Emma, Marketing


Halifax's new ad highlights how it can touch millions of lives with a single piece of advice.

The latest Halifax ad has reached number ten in Adwatch, with 65% recall. Created by Bates UK, the 60-second ad focuses on the ways in which Halifax helps people get on with their lives.

The commercial opens with Perry, the cinema projectionist, talking on the phone to a man from the Halifax, who is helping him pay off his credit card.

The ad shows how this helping hand generates a chain reaction, and people's good fortunes have a positive effect on others throughout the community.

These people include a limousine hire firm, a wedding party, a photographer, a male model, a stuntman and a barber, as well as more well-known faces -- Mr Gilbert, the wigmaker from the BBC's docu-soap Paddington Green, and actor Charles Dance. The ad carries the familiar 'Get a little extra help' strapline, and a version of The Beatles song Help is played throughout.

Adam Leigh, deputy managing director at Bates UK, says: "Our first objective was to contemporise the Halifax advertising and move away from the established 'people' campaign, which showed hundreds of people forming a house and a bridge. …

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