Shape Up with Anthea Turner

By Turner, Anthea | The People (London, England), January 10, 1999 | Go to article overview

Shape Up with Anthea Turner


Turner, Anthea, The People (London, England)


AS you start to shed weight on our Slim 2000 diet, your body will need a little TLC - that's Tone, Lift and Condition.

So we asked Anthea Turner to share with Sunday People Magazine readers the secrets of the personal work-out programme that keeps her in such great shape.

No-one knows better than TV star Anthea what it's like trying to fit exercise around a hectic work and social life. But it can be done - and here she shows you how. Follow her routine three times a week and you CAN have the body you've dreamed of.

"I've been doing the exercises for ten years and they certainly work for me," says Anthea. "If you do them regularly, they will tone your body and give you a flat tummy."

The routine was devised for Anthea by Jean-Ann Marnoch, who trains exercise teachers for the YMCA, and she demonstrates them in her new video, TLC: Tone, Lift and Condition.

"The biggest excuse we all make is that we don't have time to exercise," says Anthea. "But if you really want to get fit, you'll find the time. Get up 30 minutes earlier if you have to - the exercise will give you far more energy for the day than another half hour's sleep. Feeling fit makes you feel more confident about your body and creates a sense of well-being. That has a knock-on effect on every area of your life. You can miss out on a lot if you've no energy.

There's a lot of life out there to enjoy - and that's just what I'm going to do."

WARM-UP

Begin your warm-up routine by walking up and down stairs a few times or marching on the spot for two minutes. Give yourself a shake, then stand with your feet slightly apart, your bottom tucked in and your knees slightly bent. Circle your shoulders then try these warm up exercises. Repeat them all eight times before moving on.

Side bend:

Stand with your feet wide apart and your hands by your sides. Slowly slide one hand down the side of your leg, then return and repeat on the other side.

Hips side to side:

Bend your knees and gently move your hips from side to side, keeping your tummy tucked in.

Knee lift:

Lift your left knee up gradually then lower again. Repeat with your right leg. Remember to keep your back straight.

STRETCHES

Before you get started on the work-out it's also important

to stretch all your muscles. Do each of the stretches once, holding them for ten seconds.

Front thigh stretch:

Take hold of your instep and pull your heel gently towards your bottom without touching it. Keep your supporting knee slightly bent.

Back thigh stretch:

Standing with your feet apart in parallel, bend both your knees and place your hands on one thigh for support. Place your other leg out in front of you and gently lift your bottom up and back until you feel the stretch along the back of your thigh. …

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