Mid Term Report: Spreading the Word; Why Is It Some Advertising Slogans like 'Soft, Strong and Very Long' or That Famous Ferrero Rocher Moment at the Ambassador's Reception, Stick in Our Subconscious? HELEN McGURK Talks a Closer Look at How Companies Pitch Their Product and Talks to Peter Spratt, the Advertising Executive Who Has Been Behind a Wealth of Successful Advertising Campaigns

By McGURK, Helen | The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), August 10, 1999 | Go to article overview

Mid Term Report: Spreading the Word; Why Is It Some Advertising Slogans like 'Soft, Strong and Very Long' or That Famous Ferrero Rocher Moment at the Ambassador's Reception, Stick in Our Subconscious? HELEN McGURK Talks a Closer Look at How Companies Pitch Their Product and Talks to Peter Spratt, the Advertising Executive Who Has Been Behind a Wealth of Successful Advertising Campaigns


McGURK, Helen, The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland)


WHO will ever forget the Diet Coke man, the thirsty, toned Adonis of television commercials who peeled off this shirt and sent female pulses racing.

This ad broke with the norm by reversing traditional roles (this time it was women ogling the sex kitten). The new concept clearly worked. Following its broadcast sales of the soft drink rocketed in Britain and the States and the ideas man at Coca Cola must surely have received a hearty pat on the back.

Advertising is big business. Research shows that the average 35 year- old will have been exposed to 150,000 in their lifetime; there are 33,000 brands in the public domain at anyone time in the UK and the average household uses about 350-400 brands per annum.

In order to beat the competition ad men have to consistently dream up new ideas to keep jaded viewers interested in the product or message they are selling.

Over the last decade in Northern Ireland advertising has become more sophisticated as companies realise how important it is to getting their message across via the best possible medium.

Peter Spratt group managing director of the Anderson Spratt group, whose subsidiary Anderson Advertising is Northern Ireland's largest advertising agency, says advertising has become a readily accepted discipline and practice in business today.

"Most mature businesses in Northern Ireland and further afield will to a greater or lesser extent engage in advertising or marketing practice. That will sometimes be conducted as an in-house practice, but most will employ the consultative services of third parties - advertising agencies, marketing consultants or business advisors - and that is where we play a role.

"Similarly in Northern Ireland where there is a very large small to medium- sized profile and long established family businesses, government agencies will conduct programmes that will facilitate their clients to secure the services of professional marketing services.''

Anderson Advertising, established in 1982, is part of the Anderson Spratt group, the largest communications business in the whole of Ireland. The group comprises a number of companies including public relations (Anderson Kenny), design (Creative Pencil), research and consulting (Quest), IT (The Internet Business Ltd) and recruitment advertising (Design and Place). The group employs over 100 people and has offices in Belfast, Dublin and Edinburgh.

Anderson Advertising has worked with a considerable number of blue chip companies both in Northern Ireland and represents international companies here such as Phoenix Natural Gas, NTL, BMW, both universities and Bank of Ireland - to name but a few.

Peter says the process of advancing an idea involves many considerations for the advertising agency.

"We explore the merits of the idea or concept with the company and explore the potential audience for such an idea. We look at the commercial potential and engage in trying to intimately understand the company and how they are seeking to take it forward.

"We then advise and establish creative platforms for the development of the idea and whether or not it is to manifest itself in press advertising, television, the internet - whatever format. Then we conceptually develop work for the company's consideration, which we might then test amongst a representative audience before further refining it and taking it into the public domain,'' says Peter. …

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Mid Term Report: Spreading the Word; Why Is It Some Advertising Slogans like 'Soft, Strong and Very Long' or That Famous Ferrero Rocher Moment at the Ambassador's Reception, Stick in Our Subconscious? HELEN McGURK Talks a Closer Look at How Companies Pitch Their Product and Talks to Peter Spratt, the Advertising Executive Who Has Been Behind a Wealth of Successful Advertising Campaigns
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