Book Reviews: Now on Sale

The Mirror (London, England), January 15, 1999 | Go to article overview

Book Reviews: Now on Sale


THE BROKEN HEARTS CLUB by Ethan Black (Headline, pounds 17.99)

A problem shared is a problem halved but not if you're a member of the Broken Hearts Club, a group of New York professional males who get together to talk about how much they've been hurt by a broken relationship. Ethan Black's novel begins with this refreshingly original premise - then a string of gruesome murders suggests the BHC are taking their therapy a bit too far. If the Club were populated by women you'd say this was a clever feminist satire, but Black has gone beyond that with a very black, witty thriller with more than a few brave insights into the modern male's psyche. HHHH

CENTURY MAKERS by David Hillman & David Gibbs (Weidenfeld pounds 16.99)

As the 1900s draw to a close, it's worth reflecting that it has been a pretty amazing century for inventions and innovations. Hillman and Gibbs' book is a celebration of those brilliant little gadgets which transformed our lives. From the paperclip (1900) to the ring-pull (1962), from soft toilet paper (1942) to the tea bag (1919), these inventions are the best things since sliced bread (1912). Best of all is the story behind the Post-it Note, accidentally created by a hapless scientist trying to make the world's strongest glue. He created the world's weakest, and the rest is history. …

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Book Reviews: Now on Sale
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