Jon Tribble of Carbondale

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 11, 2019 | Go to article overview

Jon Tribble of Carbondale


Jon Tribble, an award- winning poet, writer, teacher and editor, died Oct. 2, 2019, in Carbondale.

He is survived by his wife, Allison Joseph of Carbondale; mother Betty G. Tribble of Silver Spring, Md., brother and sister-in-law Dr. David and Laura Tribble of Rockville, Md., sister-in-law Sharon Joseph of Carbondale, nephew Jonathan Luther of Phoenix, Ariz.; and nieces Katherine Tarwacki (Steve Tarwacki) of Burke, Va., and Caroline Tribble of Charleston, S.C. He was preceded in death by his father, Clifford Ray Tribble, and his sister, Elisabeth Luther.

Born in Little Rock, Ark., in 1962, Jon was a graduate of Little Rock's Parkview High School, the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, and Indiana University Bloomington, where he earned an MA in English literature and an MFA in creative writing, studying with such literary luminaries as poets Yusef Komunyakaa, Maura Stanton, Richard Cecil and David Wojahn. In Bloomington, he met and married his wife, poet and writer Allison Joseph, forming a literary partnership that would last for over 30 years.

Hired at Southern Illinois University Carbondale in 1994, Joseph and Tribble helped to found the influential literary magazine Crab Orchard Review, a journal that publishes emerging and established writers from around the world. Tribble served as managing editor for the journal's entire existence, and also is the founding editor of the Crab Orchard Series in Poetry, a book series that numbers over 80 volumes of poems. He also taught classes in literature, creative writing and literary publishing in the Department of English, bringing his real-life publishing expertise to countless generations of students. Though Joseph and Tribble had no children, they both mentored and supported generations of poets and writers in their roles as teachers and editors. …

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