Break-Ins Show Crime Has Still Not Been Cracked

By Worrall, Boris | The Birmingham Post (England), October 12, 1999 | Go to article overview

Break-Ins Show Crime Has Still Not Been Cracked


Worrall, Boris, The Birmingham Post (England)


Birmingham is the second worst place in the country for smash and grab car crime - topped only by Manchester.

The northern city has the most vehicle attacks for any area outside the Greater London region bounded by the M25.

Birmingham and the Newcastle and Gateshead area of north-east England are the next worst car crime blackspots, says research from car window company Autoglass.

The survey results come as national figures for crime were due to be published today with an increase of up to 20 per cent predicted for forces across the region.

The Autoglass table is based on the number of cars that need windows replaced as a result of crime.

Tipton in the Black Country also came in the top 20 nationally in 14th place.

But Mr Ian Carlisle, managing director of Autoglass, said: "Our latest study found that fewer than three quarters of our customers who have been victims of car crime report the incident to the police."

The survey was carried out as part of a joint campaign to raise awareness of car crime and improve methods of prevention and detection. It brings together the police, Home Office, and the insurance industry.

The Cracking Car Crime initiative was launched after the Government set targets to cut the level of auto crime by 30 per cent within five years.

Meanwhile, figures to be published by the Home Office today are expected to show recorded crime has risen by 20 per cent after five years of successive falls. …

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