Jeans Therapy; Bottom Line: Why the World's Favourite Fashion Item Still Has a Rock Solid Future

By Paterson, Roz | Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), January 23, 1999 | Go to article overview

Jeans Therapy; Bottom Line: Why the World's Favourite Fashion Item Still Has a Rock Solid Future


Paterson, Roz, Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland)


JEANS made headlines for all the wrong reasons earlier this week - the loss of 550 jobs following the closure of the Wrangler factory in Falkirk.

But any rumours about the death of denim have been greatly exaggerated.

Combat trousers and bootlegs may have cornered certain parts of the clothes market, but the most enduring fashion item of all time will always have a big future with the millions of people the world over to whom a pair of well-fitting jeans is as essential as a warm coat for the winter.

Some put it down to their durability, others say it's because they suit almost everyone.

Whatever the reason, the humble working pants created by Levi Strauss to clothe the gold miners of America in the 1870s have weathered the storms of fashion.

Few items of clothing could survive being flared or cluttered with embroidered detail.

Jeans have also suffered the indignity of being made into dungarees, they've been worn skin-tight, stone-washed, pink and purple and have even emerged, credibility intact, from being worn by the likes of Tony Blair, Keith Chegwin and Jeremy Clarkson - hardly icons of the hip and happening.

Today, the UK jeans market is worth around pounds 1075 million a year - equivalent to sales of approximately 47 million pairs.

Levi Strauss holds the biggest market share - 29 per cent - while Lee and Wrangler come second with 14 per cent.

We asked four girls who would never be without their jeans to talk about why denim will always cut it with them ...

KIRSTY CAMPBELL

NEWSGIRL Kirsty Campbell has had the blues since she was very young. The 27-year-old 96.3 QFM radio newsreader and reporter has a pair she has owned since she was 15.

Patting their torn pockets, Kirsty admits: "They've seen better days, but I just couldn't bear to part with them - they were my first ever pair of Levi's."

Kirsty's denim fashion disaster came as a 12-year-old, when she wore circulation-stopping tight jeans and a lilac beret to a youth disco.

She recalls: "I did get a snog, but I think that was despite my trendy togs, rather than because of them."

Since then, Kirsty has developed a love of Calvin Kleins. She says: "I like them - and my husband reckons I look sexy in them."

Kirsty feels that the secret of denim's success is its adaptability.

She says: "Look at jeans adverts over the decades and you can see how well they keep up.

`The Brutus and Falmer ads of the 70s were so groovy and of their time, but just when you thought jeans were stuck in the 70s, along came Nick Kamen putting his jeans in the washing machine."

Kirsty also says jeans are a great leveller. She explains: "Anyone can afford them, and they don't tell people whether you're wealthy or poor, or what you do for a living.

"I suppose that's why they're so popular with movie stars - they make them look like regular guys."

DEBBIE JOLLIE

PART-TIME model Debbie Jollie was well into her teens before she became a jeans fan.

The 18-year-old, who also works for Hoi Polloi, only converted to denim three years ago.

She explains: "I've got a twin brother, and that put me off wearing anything that would make me look like a boy."

However, the arrival of skin-tight Versace jeans for girls made her change her mind.

She admits: "I didn't realise jeans could look so sexy. Now I'm a big fan of Levi's 501s for women, which are incredibly flattering. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Jeans Therapy; Bottom Line: Why the World's Favourite Fashion Item Still Has a Rock Solid Future
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.