Gay Stereotypes Should Stay Firmly in the Closet; GET REAL (15)

By Synnot, Siobhan | Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), May 14, 1999 | Go to article overview

Gay Stereotypes Should Stay Firmly in the Closet; GET REAL (15)


Synnot, Siobhan, Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland)


TEENAGER Steven Carter (Ben Silverstone), is smart, funny - and gay. Since he's still at school, he is still in the closet.

So far, the 16 year old has managed to keep his sexuality a secret, though the local bully has his suspicions. But the only person who knows Steven goes cruising after school is his chubby best girlfriend Linda (Charlotte Brittain).

To add to Steven's growing pains, he's stuck in Basingstoke, living at home with his mother and a dad so obsessed by Dr Who, he's been known to get into his car and drive off, dressed as a cyberman.

There's also a nice girl at school who has a rather obvious crush on him and won't take the hint.

One day, Steven gets an anonymous note. To his shock, it turns out the sender is John Dixon (Brad Gorton), a ridiculously-privileged and popular fellow student.

John is not only the school's head boy, but a superb athlete who has won a place at Oxford. He also comes from an enormously-wealthy family, lives in a mansion with a pool and has a sports car to ferry around his gorgeous underwear model girlfriend Christina (Louise J. Taylor).

When the pair finally meet, they have an awkward chat, followed by an even more awkward kiss. Then John rushes off in horror. But neither can get the encounter out of his mind and a passionate, secretive affair develops.

But John is even more confused and closeted than Steven. He says he loves him, but forbids him to tell anyone. In public, he continues to play it straight.

So their relationship becomes more complicated than a British Rail timetable.

Steven grows tired of living a lie, but John is determined to keep their relationships under wraps and keep his golden-boy image.

In public, he keeps his distance and, at one point, John even has to beat up Steven to reassure his mates that he's not gay. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Gay Stereotypes Should Stay Firmly in the Closet; GET REAL (15)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.