Who Has the Sexiest Job in the City?

By Mallon, Margaret; Wrottesley, Catriona | Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), February 15, 1999 | Go to article overview

Who Has the Sexiest Job in the City?


Mallon, Margaret, Wrottesley, Catriona, Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland)


SOPHIE RHYS-JONES has clearly done for public relations girls what Ally McBeal did for female lawyers.

While a decade ago a man's ideal partner would no doubt have been a pretty secretary with a curvy figure and polished short-hand, a recent survey shows that PR is the sexiest career option for women.

Men apparently just can't get enough of those sassy women in their sharp, smart suits.

And women want a man who is good at technical drawing, that is, they lust after architects. But what kind of influence do people's jobs really have on relationships?

According to Janice O'Reilly - a 28-year-old public relations executive from Glasgow, her job puzzles men rather than turns them on.

And Eleanor Hamilton - whose profession came bottom of the survey's list of 10 - believes men do like a lawyer because they hope she'll be as cute as Calista Flockhart.

Women in PR are in high demand because they are perceived as people-friendly go- getters, skilled at combining their communication and presentation skills to generate an appealing first impression.

And what about the men? Men who are architects are seen as creative and responsible, according to the study by psychologist Dr Lance Workman of the University of Glamorgan.

His research showed that the top 10 fields for women were PR, actress, journalist, banker, marketing, recruitment, artist, director, doctor and solicitor.

Men's top 10 were architect, banker, doctor, TV/film, barrister, media, artist director, computers, teacher.

The reason dates back to pre-historic times.

Dr Workman said: "Both men and women have always been driven by the genetic need to make sure their offspring have strong genes that ensure their survival.

"This basic genetic impulse is behind our choice of a long-term partner."

Glasgow University consultant psychiatrist Dr Prem Misra said: "In these days of increasing competitiveness and insecurity, women are attracted to men in stable professions like architecture and medicine.

"Being well-paid is significant, but stability is a more important factor. A managing director of a company will get paid more than a doctor or an architect, but a businessman can always be made redundant whereas doctors and architects are more or less guaranteed jobs for life.

"Men are attracted to women in high profile glamorous jobs like PR, acting and the media because there is a certain showbiz element to their lives. They are on display and viewed as objects of desire by other men. Women are still very much judged on their looks."

Mary Balfour, who runs the introductions agency, Drawing Down the Moon, also agrees with Dr Workman's conclusions.

She bases her comments on more than 15,000 clients who were asked for their preferences about the career of a member of the opposite sex.

However, she warns that a person's attitude towards their work is as important as their job title.

Men are keen that the woman they select is in control of her work and not the other way round. Women are more relaxed about workaholic men.

She said: "Men are very wary of women who have no time for relationships.

"They know that to get to the top women have to work twice as hard as men. They know these women will not have space in their busy lives for them."

While wealth itself is rarely specified by clients, a responsible attitude towards finances is seen as attractive by both sexes.

An artist who makes his living as a fashion designer is far more likely to appeal to women, for example, than one who paints in a studio, whose earnings may be precarious.

Most well-paid women seek a man who earns at least as much as them, but men are often wary of a woman with a higher income.

While most professional people are attracted to people in their field of work, Ms Balfour said that there was a growing unwillingness among professionals to pair up with colleagues. …

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