Police Investigate US Bank's Connection to Russian Mafia

By Deane, John | The Birmingham Post (England), August 21, 1999 | Go to article overview

Police Investigate US Bank's Connection to Russian Mafia


Deane, John, The Birmingham Post (England)


Detectives investigating allegations of a pounds 6.25 billion money laundering operation by Russian mobsters have visited the London offices of the Bank of New York.

National Crime Squad officers visited the bank's offices at Canary Wharf, in London's Docklands, on Thursday.

The visit came a day after NCS officers executed a search warrant at a mansion block flat in Marylebone, Central London, home to one of the bank's employees, Russian-born Ms Lucy Edwards, and her husband, Mr Peter Berlin.

Although the couple were present no arrests were made. But officers did remove documents.

Yesterday a spokeswoman confirmed that NCS officers had visited the bank's London offices. But she emphasised that the premises were not searched, nor was anyone arrested.

"Bank officials gave us every assistance possible," she stressed. No other premises in the UK have been visited during the inquiry.

The NCS declined to disclose details of the nature of the investigation, which involves liaison with US law enforcement agencies, thought to include the FBI.

But it is believed that the NCS is inquiring into allegations that Russia's so-called "Red Mafia" has used the bank's facilities to launder up to pounds 6.25 billion.

Law enforcement officials said that accounts under scrutiny were linked to the suspected kingpin of the Red Mafia, Mr Semyon Yukovich Mogilevich - sometimes called "The Brainy Don" because he has an economics degree. …

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