EXHIBITIONS PICTURE OF THE WEEK; Sorrow (1882). by Vincent Van Gogh (1853-1890). New Art Gallery, Walsall

The Birmingham Post (England), February 26, 2000 | Go to article overview

EXHIBITIONS PICTURE OF THE WEEK; Sorrow (1882). by Vincent Van Gogh (1853-1890). New Art Gallery, Walsall


Some years ago this well-known drawing by van Gogh turned up in a Channel 4 quiz programme in which art experts were challenged to identify works in British public collections from small details.

None of the panellists were able to identify it, but one of them commented ruefully: "I knew what it was, but I couldn't believe it was in a British collection."

Possibly the most important single item among the 350-odd works in the Garman Ryan Collection, given to Walsall by Lady Epstein in 1974 and now rehoused in the magnificent New Art Gallery, this early drawing was sent by van Gogh

to his brother Theo with the note "enclosed is what in my opinion is the best figure I have yet drawn".

The model is a woman called Clasina Maria Hoornik, known as Sien, whom van Gogh had taken into his home when she was pregnant and working as a prostitute.

As well as the English title "Sorrow", the drawing is inscribed with a quotation in French from the French social historian MJ Michelet: "How can there be on earth a woman alone, abandoned?'

The drawing, which van Gogh later turned into a lithograph for popular distribution, reflects the element of Victorian moralising in his early social realist work, which followed periods working as a teacher in Ramsgate and a missionary among the poor in Belgium.

Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery 0121 303 2834: Visions of Birmingham: The planners' dream and the people's reality 1900-2030. Until Feb 28; Landscape Watercolours 1760-1830. Until Feb 28; Images of Christ. Until April 30; Gas Hall: 20th Century Art. The largest display ever mounted of the city's modern art collection. Until March 4 (Mon-Thur, Sat 10am-5pm, Fri 10.30am-5pm, Sun 12.30pm-5pm).

Ikon Gallery, Brindleyplace 0121 248 0708: Lost. An international exhibition of sculpture, painting, photography and installations curated by artist Tania Kovats. Until April 2 (Tues-Sun 11am-6pm).

Barber Institute of Fine Arts, Birmingham University 0121 414 7333: Royal Riding Lessons. A rare outing from the Barber's archives for a set of etchings by Crispin de Passe recording Louis XIII's equestrian pastimes. Until March 24 (Mon-Sat 10am-5pm, Sun 2pm-5pm).

MAC, Cannon Hill Park 0121 440 3838: A Deluge of Human Indifference. New drawings by Gerald Davies. Until March 5; Surface Tension. Photographs by Robert Davies. Ends tomorrow; Woven Water. Tapestries by Bobbie Cox inspired by Devon waterways. Ends tomorrow; A Way of Life: Portraits of the Funeral Trade. Photographs by Len Grant. Until March 12 (Daily noon-8pm).

Mead Gallery, Warwick Arts Centre 01203 524524: Fresh Masala. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

EXHIBITIONS PICTURE OF THE WEEK; Sorrow (1882). by Vincent Van Gogh (1853-1890). New Art Gallery, Walsall
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.