Beatles Photographer; Puerto Rican Astrologer; 'Lesson before Dying' Author

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), November 10, 2019 | Go to article overview

Beatles Photographer; Puerto Rican Astrologer; 'Lesson before Dying' Author


Byline: Daily Herald news services

Photographer Robert Freeman, who helped define the image of The Beatles with some of the band's best-known album covers, has died aged 82.

A statement on The Beatles' official website announced Freeman's death Friday but didn't give a cause.

Born in 1936, Freeman began his career as a photojournalist for London's Sunday Times and captured portraits of leading jazz musicians before working with The Beatles. He shot the black-and-white cover for the 1963 album "With The Beatles," picturing the Fab Four's faces in part-shadow. It became a defining image of the group and was used for the 1964 U.S. album "Meet The Beatles!"

Freeman went on to photograph the covers of "Beatles For Sale," 'Help!" with its image of the band members holding semaphore-style flags and "Rubber Soul." For that 1965 album Freeman subtly stretched The Beatles' faces, subtly suggesting the psychedelic experiments to come.

Ringo Starr tweeted: "God bless Robert Freeman peace and love to all his family."

* The colorful chairwoman of Oregon-based Columbia Sportswear Co., who starred in ads proclaiming her as "One Tough Mother," died Nov. 3 in a Portland, Oregon, assisted living facility. Gert Boyle was 95.

Boyle took over the small outdoor clothing company in 1970 after her husband died from a heart attack. At the time, she was a 46-year-old housewife and mother of three with no real business experience. But she helped build the struggling company into a national brand and retailer.

"Early to bed, early to rise, work like hell and advertise," Boyle often said, among other pet phrases.

It was her role in an advertising campaign in the 1980s that gave her national exposure.

The ads showed Boyle putting her son, Tim, president of the company, through treacherous outdoor feats to ensure the products met her standards.

* A character actor who was most recently known for his role in "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel" has died in his Manhattan home. Brian Tarantina was 60.

Police responded to the apartment shortly before 1 a.m. Saturday, and Tarantina was pronounced dead at the scene. The cause of death was being determined by the medical examiner.

On "Mrs. Maisel," Tarantina played an emcee at a comedy club called the Gaslight. He had roles in a number of television shows and movies, including "Gilmore Girls" and "BlacKkKlansman."

* Stephen Dixon a prolific novelist and short-story writer whose humorous, freewheeling fiction traced the shocks and jolts of romance, aging and everyday life, in an experimental but plain-spoken style that brought readers deep inside the minds of his characters died Wednesday at a hospice center in Towson, Maryland. He was 83.

The cause was pneumonia and complications from Parkinson's disease, said his daughter Sophia Frydman. …

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