Tusk Force; Two Little Boys Want a Big Day out. How Will Their Parents' Plans Measure Up to Elephant-Sized Expectations?

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), September 26, 1998 | Go to article overview

Tusk Force; Two Little Boys Want a Big Day out. How Will Their Parents' Plans Measure Up to Elephant-Sized Expectations?


Picture the Robertson family living room at 9am. Tomas fancies a day at a theme park. Little Christopher nods, wide-eyed in agreement. Two little heads look up hopefully at mum and dad. Two little voices say "Perlease..."

Mum Irma shakes her head. Dad Scot says `Sorry, no. Today we're off to the...' he says the word. `M... M... Museum.'

Parents love museums - because they're educational. Quiet (yawn). And most of all they're FREE. Kids, somehow, remain unconvinced.

Can Kelvingrove Art Gallery measure up to Alton Towers? We thought not, but we found out. Honestly, now...

First we learn the facts. The Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum is Scotland's most popular free tourist attraction.

Every year more than one million visitors make their way to the imposing sandstone building that is one of Glasgow's most prominent landmarks.

And who can blame them? Set in Kelvingrove Park near the University and Glasgow's West End, the Museum boasts one of the finest civic art collections in Britain - including works by Botticelli, Whistler and Cadell - as well as historical examples of European arms and armour AND the natural history of Scotland.

Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum is one of those rare attractions that really does offer something for nothing. The `free' factor.

Where else could you learn about the variety of wildlife in Scotland; discover the Bronze Age; find out about the life of Charles Rennie Mackintosh and prehistoric life in Scotland?

Die-hard museum fans Irma and Scot are more than happy to brave the crowds with their two sons, whatever the weather

Like most youngsters their age, Christopher and Tomas love action-packed theme park days out. But for a family of four, some attractions can prove just too expensive. …

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