Bush Babes; George's Sons Race for the White House

The Mirror (London, England), November 5, 1998 | Go to article overview

Bush Babes; George's Sons Race for the White House


NOT since the celebrated days of the Kennedys has one family had so much political power.

Here come the Bush babes - the sons of former President George Bush.

George Jnr won Texas and his younger brother Jeb made it - just - in Florida. The Bush dynasty is starting to roll.

Mum and dad, George and Barbara, watched their sons' double victory and said: "We are the proudest parents in America."

Now the Bush push for the White House begins in earnest.

George Jnr has his eyes firmly set on the Presidential elections in 2000. But he'd better watch out for his little brother. Jeb has also made no secret of his long-term political ambitions.

Both admit they have discussed "conditionally" about becoming President of the United States.

There is fierce competition between the two. "Forget the politics," says a friend, "you should see them play tennis or even backgammon. It can be frightening."

One thing's for sure - life will never be boring with the Bush brothers around.

Both have been accused of being caught up in financial scandals. And both like to make their presence felt.

ONE-TIME heavy drinker George loves strutting round baseball games, wearing ostrich-skin boots and chewing bubble gum.

At a White House dinner in honour of the Queen, he was ordered to sit at the far end of the table because his mum was scared of what he might say.

Jeb is a rebel who revelled in telling his Protestant parents he was marrying a Mexican girl - and later becoming a Catholic.

Both are keenly aware of carrying on a family tradition that started earlier this century when their grandfather was elected senator for Connecticut. George Jnr says: "We inherited a great name - it's a great political legacy and it's obviously a political advantage. But our election is also a great tribute to my mum and dad.

"My father is my political role model - being George Bush's son is a huge plus for me."

Jeb is just as proud. He says: "There are very few people who have served this country with the honour and distinction of my dad.

"But as the son of a famous person, I carry the pluses and minuses of past wars. …

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