The Yamasee Indians: From Florida to South Carolina

By Johnson, D. Andrew | The Journal of Southern History, November 2019 | Go to article overview

The Yamasee Indians: From Florida to South Carolina


Johnson, D. Andrew, The Journal of Southern History


The Yatnasee Indians: From Florida to South Carolina. Edited by Denise I. Bossy. (Lincoln and London: University of Nebraska Press, 2018. Pp. xx, 348. $75.00, ISBN 978-1-4962-0760-9.)

Through historical circumstance and the strategies that they adopted for coping with colonialism and the ensuing social disruptions, the Yamasees became one of the most important peoples in contact with European colonizers in late-seventeenth- and early-eighteenth-century North America. The Yamasees are currently known for two things: their role as favorite partners of English traders from Carolina in the trade in indigenous enslaved peoples and deerskins, and their violent reaction against English colonialism in the Yamasee War in 1715. The Yamasee Indians: From Florida to South Carolina dives deeper into the Yamasees as people navigating historical contexts and persevering, even as neighboring peoples lost their collective identities and social formations. This collection began as a conference of historians and archaeologists that was organized by Denise I. Bossy and archaeologist Chester DePratter in April 2015--the three-hundredth anniversary of the beginning of the Yamasee War. The resulting anthology is well worth the effort. Broken into three sections, The Yamasee Indians details "Yamasee Identity," "Yamasee Networks," and "Surviving the Yamasee War." Each section is roughly chronological, and when combined, they piece together a history of the Yamasees from their early colonial beginnings in the piedmont of modern Georgia to removal in the 1830s.

Part 1, "Yamasee Identity," begins with an excellent essay by Amy Turner Bushnell. In "Living at Liberty: The Ungovernable Yamasees of Spanish Florida," Bushnell argues that, between the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. the Yamasees shifted alliances, moved towns, and altered their economic production in order to maintain their liberty. Bushnell's contribution, along with the second essay, by archaeologist Keith Ashley, serves as a foundation for the essays that follow. Ashley's concern is the early years of Yamasee identity formation, and he argues that the peoples who adopted the Yamasee name were refugees who fled the piedmont of modern Georgia to Florida in the face of Chichimeco (Westo) attacks during the late seventeenth century. They subsequently refused to submit to Spanish missionaries' social practices, instead opting for political autonomy. The Yamasees, then, were at first a sociopolitical movement that led to ethnogenesis between the 1660s and 1680s. The final two essays in the first section (by Eric C. Poplin and Jon Bernard Marcoux and by Alexander Y. Sweeney) use archaeological evidence to trace cultural change and continuity among Yamasees as they moved from the piedmont to Spanish missions, then north toward Carolina. Poplin and Marcoux argue that Yamasee women adopted the pottery styles of other peoples living in the Spanish missions and took these styles with them to Carolina. However, there are traceable differences between decorative motifs used by the Lower (formerly piedmont) and Upper (Florida inhabitants who joined the exodus) Yamasee towns near Carolina. Nevertheless, Sweeney argues that "the Yamasee were able to retain a variety of their traditional cultural practices" (p. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Yamasee Indians: From Florida to South Carolina
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.