Jennifer Breithaupt: BANKING ON THE POWER OF CONNECTION

By Fera, Rae Ann | ADWEEK, November 4, 2019 | Go to article overview

Jennifer Breithaupt: BANKING ON THE POWER OF CONNECTION


Fera, Rae Ann, ADWEEK


When Breithaupt became global consumer chief marketing officer of Citi in 2017, she was given an unusual mission: to bring more emotion to a 207-year-old financial services brand that wasn't exactly dripping with the feels.

First, she addressed the tone of Citi's advertising. "If you look at our work pre-2017 -- and I will admit I was responsible for some of it--we focused on our products and services. We would talk and talk and talk and talk," says Breithaupt. Under her direction, Citi stopped talking at customers and instead put them at the center of its branding. This shift came with a new tagline, "Welcome what's next," which signaled all the life moments a customer turns to their bank for, from buying a home to sending a kid to college.

A new tune

Then Breithaupt dialed it up by leveraging Citi's longstanding connection to music. The brand launched Citi Entertainment a decade ago, which provides customers with presale tickets, exclusive access and other offers related to movies, music, TV and sports. The Citi Sound Vault Series, meanwhile, has since 2017 provided cardholders with premium access to intimate performances with A-list artists. Having witnessed the impact of #SeeHer, the Association of National Advertisers' initiative to eliminate unconscious bias against women and girls in advertising and media, Breithaupt realized similar progress could be made in the music industry--and in the process, strike an emotional chord.

"It's just staggering how few women there are in music," says Breithaupt. "You talk to artists that are female and they'll tell you it was a struggle, how they had to hustle harder. If we can make it just a little easier on women coming up through the industry, that's a strong message."

On International Women's Day this year, Citi announced on The Today Show that it would lead #SeeHerHearHear (an extension of the ANA's #SeeHer initiative), which aims to bring gender parity and exposure to the music industry, as well as to music in advertising. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Jennifer Breithaupt: BANKING ON THE POWER OF CONNECTION
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.