World-Class Barbecue; Get Set for a Sizzling Summer with Our Bumper Barbecue Pull-Out Packed with Useful Cooking Tips and Ideas for Finger-Licking Food

Sunday Mirror (London, England), May 10, 1998 | Go to article overview

World-Class Barbecue; Get Set for a Sizzling Summer with Our Bumper Barbecue Pull-Out Packed with Useful Cooking Tips and Ideas for Finger-Licking Food


However simple, there's something about the chargrilled flavour of barbecued food that makes it taste extra special. Maybe it owes part of its appeal to the fresh air that sharpens the appetite and makes that tantalising aroma utterly irresistible.

There's nothing new about cooking over charcoal - in fact it's a method that has been used for centuries. Today's grills are very sophisticated - making the job easier, cleaner and more controllable.

But whether you're cooking a sausage over a pile of sticks or a three- course meal on a state-of-the-art gas grill, outdoor cooking can be fun, easy and inexpensive.

It's not entirely clear how the word "barbecue" originated. One explanation is that it comes from "barbacoa", a Spanish-American word used by the Caribbean Arawak tribe as the name for the wooden frame that held their food over an open fire as it cooked.

The food, however, was rather different from what we eat today. . . the Arawaks were cannibals.

Whatever your tastes, you'll find all the inspiration and know-how you need for hassle-free outdoor entertaining in our 8-page pull-out.

There's advice on choosing the best barbecue for your needs, what kind of fuel to use, cooking times and a safety guide, plus a whole range of delicious easy-to-make recipes for every occasion from quick lunches to special occasions.

There are new, unusual ideas as well as some traditional favourites - from family meals to spicy, fruity and exotic grills using fish.

We've got simple sauces and marinades to turn even the most basic of ingredients into something special, and a feast of innovative ideas for vegetarians.

But the best thing about a barbecue is that it not only frees the cook from the kitchen but also encourages everyone else to help.

CHOOSING A GRILL

There is a huge choice of ready-made grills on the market, and it's important to choose one that suits your particular needs. First decide how many people you want to cook for, and where you are likely to use the grill. For instance, do you usually have barbecues just for the family, or are you likely to have barbecue parties for lots of friends? Once you've decided on your basic requirements, you will be able to choose between the different types more easily. . .

HIBACHIS

These small cast-iron grills (above) originated in Japan. The word hibachi translates literally as "firebox". They are inexpensive, easy to use and easily transportable. Lightweight versions are now made in steel or aluminum.

PORTABLE GRILLS

These are usually quite light and fold away to fit in a car boot so you can take them on picnics. Some are even small enough to fit into a backpack.

BRAZIER GRILLS

These open grills (right) are suitable for use on a patio or in the garden. Most have legs or wheels, and it's a good idea to check that the height suits you. The grill area of a brazier varies in size, and the brazier may be round or rectangular. It's useful to choose one that has a shelf attached to the side. Other extras may include an electric, battery-powered or clockwork spit - choose one you can adjust the height of. Many brazier grills have a hood, which is useful as a windbreak and gives a place to mount the spit.

DISPOSABLE GRILLS

These will last for about an hour and are a convenient idea for picnic- style barbecues or for cooking just a few small pieces of food.

KETTLE GRILLS

These have a large, hinged lid, which can be used as a windbreak or closed allowing the grill to be used like an oven. With the lid closed, even large cuts of meat or whole turkeys cook successfully, as the heat reflected within the dome helps to brown the meat evenly. This type of grill can also be used for home-smoking foods.

GAS GRILLS

The main advantage of these is their convenience - the heat is instant and easily controllable. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

World-Class Barbecue; Get Set for a Sizzling Summer with Our Bumper Barbecue Pull-Out Packed with Useful Cooking Tips and Ideas for Finger-Licking Food
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.