Alzheimer's Disease - Let's Do Something about It; Advertisement Feature Dr Stephen Pearson Is a Specialist in Alzheimer's Research at Re:Cognition Health. Re:Cognition Health Are Running a Number of Exciting New Trials Designed to Halt the Progression of Memory Impairment at Their UK Clinics, Including Their Birmingham Clinic on Hagley Road

Sunday Mercury (Birmingham, England), November 24, 2019 | Go to article overview

Alzheimer's Disease - Let's Do Something about It; Advertisement Feature Dr Stephen Pearson Is a Specialist in Alzheimer's Research at Re:Cognition Health. Re:Cognition Health Are Running a Number of Exciting New Trials Designed to Halt the Progression of Memory Impairment at Their UK Clinics, Including Their Birmingham Clinic on Hagley Road


ALZHEIMER'S is fast becoming the most-feared illness in people over the age of 55 - but how can you tell when memory issues are 'normal' or a sign of something more concerning, like mild cognitive impairment? If you or your partner are concerned that you have developed significant and progressive memory problems - to the degree where you have forgotten where you have parked the car rather than just misplacing the car keys! Or you have trouble finding your way around or perhaps have developed some word finding difficulties then we will be happy to assess you for a possible clinical trial.

Like many other conditions, prevention is better than cure - and Re:Cognition Health in Birmingham is running a number of exciting new trials which are designed to halt the progression of memory impairment.

The word dementia describes a set of symptoms that may include memory loss and difficulties with thinking, problem-solving or language.

Dementia is caused when the brain is damaged by diseases, such as Alzheimer's, or a series of strokes.

About 850,000 people in the UK current living with dementia, and it's estimated around one in three people over the age of 65 will develop this terrifying disease.

The number of people with dementia is increasing because people are living longer; by 2025 the number is expected to rise to more than one million, and by 2050 it is projected to exceed two million.

Dr Stephen Pearson is a specialist in Alzheimer's research and oversees all the trial processes at Re:Cognition Health in Plymouth where he is based.

Here, he explains common misconceptions about Alzheimer's, what's being done to prevent this deadly disease, and how you can help yourself, your loved ones and future generations.

alzheimer's and dementia - KNOW the difference "People in general get really confused about Alzheimer's and dementia. The truth is that Alzheimer's is the most common form of dementia in people over the age of 65.

"Increasingly, with time, we're not using the dementia word so much, because that implies an advanced state of cognitive impairment, where you're in a care home having all your needs provided for, and you are literally without mind from the latin dementis.

"Nowadays, as we're doing the research trials, we're moving to look at early disease and trying to understand the processes behind why people develop Alzheimer's."

Who is most at risk of getting alzheimer's? "Age is a risk factor, but not everyone who is old develops Alzheimer's, so it's becoming the most-feared illness in people over the age of 55. It's hidden, it sneaks along and the treatments that are available have been around for 20 years and are symptomatic drugs only. "Of course, the backdrop to it all is the scale of the problem that's increasing - and that's because of the increasing age of the population.

"In specific areas of the UK, there's a high elderly population, with big growth in the number of 85-year-olds, and that means in the next 10 or 20 years, cases of dementia are going to double in these areas".

"So we really need to do something about it to prevent the illness and prepare ourselves for this challenge that's facing us." What are the most common signs of memory loss? According to NHS England, mood swings, depression, repeating questions, poor concentration and confusion can all be signs of dementia. Would you, or someone you know, answer yes to any of the following questions? |Asking the same thing several times a day.

|Forgetting details of conversations and recent events.

|Trouble remembering appointments.

| Unknowingly telling the same story or anecdote.

|Losing your way in familiar environments.

If so, the Re:Cognition Health team can tell you more about the range of research trials taking place in Birmingham.

What's being done to help prevent alzheimer's? "A lot of the research trials being done by the team in Birmingham are to better understand the disease and to find better treatments. …

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Alzheimer's Disease - Let's Do Something about It; Advertisement Feature Dr Stephen Pearson Is a Specialist in Alzheimer's Research at Re:Cognition Health. Re:Cognition Health Are Running a Number of Exciting New Trials Designed to Halt the Progression of Memory Impairment at Their UK Clinics, Including Their Birmingham Clinic on Hagley Road
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