Just the Job:Benefits of Being Put to the Test

By Sheridan, Peter | The Birmingham Post (England), October 3, 1998 | Go to article overview

Just the Job:Benefits of Being Put to the Test


Sheridan, Peter, The Birmingham Post (England)


You've got through the first stage of the interview. You know they like you. You're feeling confident and the job's nearly yours. The only hurdle left is that great unknown - the psychometric test.

All too often, the mystique surrounding this form of assessment strikes fear into the heart of any potential employee. Hardly surprising, as the candidate is often unsure of the criteria against which he or she is being judged, let alone the format of th e test.

In reality, this is why psychometrics are so effective. They measure aspects of job performance reasonably accurately, as they judge inherent abilities and not a person's capacity to "swot up".

However, there are ways and means of pushing your score up.

Psychometrics employs three main types of test, identifying ability and aptitude, personality and interests. Generally, all three are implemented at interview level by a company serious about getting the right person for the job.

Ability and aptitude tests measure aspects such as verbal, numerical and abstract reasoning. Most have a set time for completion and there are right and wrong answers.

In this category it is possible to increase your score if you make yourself familiar with the type of test likely to be put in front of you. Although it is highly unlikely you will be able to get copies of the original tests - these are only available to professional examiners - there are books which cover the types of questions which might be set.

There are plenty of paperbacks covering psychometrics available in the psychology section of your local library. …

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