The (Opera) House That Derek Built; from Lily Savage to the Royal Ballet, It's All Coming Our Way Soon

By Hill, Ian | The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), June 11, 1998 | Go to article overview

The (Opera) House That Derek Built; from Lily Savage to the Royal Ballet, It's All Coming Our Way Soon


Hill, Ian, The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland)


IF YOU haven't got your plans made for any evening out, until February of next year, Belfast's Grand Opera House has the solution.

For as the News Letter has learned, the city's most loved performance space will today announce an unequalled programme of events running right up to its Christmas Pantomime.

Top of the bill comes the all-Ireland debut of the Royal Ballet with a programme already tipped to be one of the aces in November's Belfast Festival.

The ballet company's Belfast date is their only one in the United Kingdom outside of London. Their programme is stunning. The full company, with top stars including Darcey Bussell, Leanne Benjamin and Stuart Cassidy plus the great Sylvie Guillem, will present first Massenet's Maon to choreography by Kenneth MacMillan, then a three ballet melange of Frederick Ashton's version of Elgar's Enigma Variations and short pieces mixing romance and elegance.

Derek Nicholls, the Opera House's Director, says the company is in the premiere league as far as ballet is concerned.

''This glittering season is arguably the most significant ballet event ever to be staged in Northern Ireland. For us it's a major coup. However I'm hoping this glitter won't put the rest of our new season in the shade for its one of the most adventurous we've ever presented full of top shows, top stars and an amazing range of delights'', he told me ahead of today's announcement.

Derek has learnt a lot about Ulster's tastes since he first came here, so classical white ballet isn't the only temptation.

Jaleo, the award winning company from Seville, return in late October with a new programme of flamenco. In contrast to both, Diversions Dance, leaders in contemporary and no strangers to Belfast, return for one night on October 25.

The House's autumn season opens, and closes, as is now traditional, with pantomime. The curtain goes up on the summer one on July 29. It's Beauty and the Beast with the everlasting Lionel Blair and Anne Hailes.

And amongst these delights fans of the West End will surely pick out Smokey Joe's Cafe, Jesus Christ Superstar and Joseph and the Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat in which Richard Swerrun in this title role of a production dubbed ''the world's best loved '' by this newspaper on its last visit to Belfast.

Smokey Joe's, Derek assures News Letter readers, bears no relevance to the once popular Sixties chippie based on the city's University Road. Instead it's an evocation of the music of The Drifters, The Coasters and of course Elvis with a reprise of Stand by Me, Hound Dog, Jailhouse Rock and the poignant Pearl's A Singer. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The (Opera) House That Derek Built; from Lily Savage to the Royal Ballet, It's All Coming Our Way Soon
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.