Science: The Comet Man; Ecology Expert Mike Bailey Could Be Accused of Not Seeing the Wood for the Trees over His Theory That Oak Tree Circles Explain Our Most Amazing Myths, Legends and Biblical Miracles. but He Is a Firm Believer in 'From Little Acorns Grow' .

By Oldham, Jeanette | The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), May 28, 1998 | Go to article overview

Science: The Comet Man; Ecology Expert Mike Bailey Could Be Accused of Not Seeing the Wood for the Trees over His Theory That Oak Tree Circles Explain Our Most Amazing Myths, Legends and Biblical Miracles. but He Is a Firm Believer in 'From Little Acorns Grow' .


Oldham, Jeanette, The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland)


Queen's University paleoecology professor, Mike Bailey, has dedicated three years of his professional life to studying oak tree rings, and reckons they reveal the 'astronomical' story behind the Bible's plagues and pestilence, and even King Arthur's 'bright gods in the sky.''

His findings are contained in a book he has written, called Exodus Arthur - Close Encounters with Comets and Fiery Dragons - which is due out in the shops later this summer and has been tipped to re-write history altogether.

Prof Bailey disclosed some of its fascinating facts to the News Letter yesterday: ''It might sound extraordinary to some, but I believe, and other scientists agree with me, that tree rings, which tell you how old a tree is, can explain away the environmental miracles of myths, legends and the Bible as environmental phenomen caused by debris from comets.

''And we are talking specifically about the debris which falls from dead comets. When the earth travels through a sphere where there is a lot of debris, the earth's environment takes a turn for the worse.

''We have established this by studying the tree rings of Irish Oaks. We can chart them back millions of years.

''When we transferred them to a graph we saw that when there was a thin ring, the tree considered its environment to be bad.

''The most interesting thing about all of this was that the poorest years for the tree, where it didn't grow well because of bad environmental conditions, also co-incided with cataclysmic events in history, such as King Arthur's death when there were apparently bright gods and dragon fire in the sky, or certain events in the Bible, previously explained as acts of God.

''Up until just a few years ago scientists tended to believe that volcano eruptions were the cause of these 'low peaks' in tree growth. But we've been able to find low peaks when we know no volcanoes erupted.

''That's when we started considering the idea that something else might be to blame. …

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Science: The Comet Man; Ecology Expert Mike Bailey Could Be Accused of Not Seeing the Wood for the Trees over His Theory That Oak Tree Circles Explain Our Most Amazing Myths, Legends and Biblical Miracles. but He Is a Firm Believer in 'From Little Acorns Grow' .
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