There Are around 50 Michael Stones Loose in the Midlands; Doctors Admit That Men Walking the Streets with Severe Personality Disorders Could Turn into Killers without a Second Thought

Sunday Mercury (Birmingham, England), November 1, 1998 | Go to article overview

There Are around 50 Michael Stones Loose in the Midlands; Doctors Admit That Men Walking the Streets with Severe Personality Disorders Could Turn into Killers without a Second Thought


U P to 50 monsters like Michael Stone are walking the streets of the Midlands, the Sunday Mercury can reveal today.

All are men with psychotic personality disorders which could make them capable of murder without a second thought.

And all could snap at any moment - with any one of us the victim.

The terrifying revelation of the scale of the nightmare comes as Stone starts three life sentences, for the murder of mum Lin Russell and her daughter Megan Russell, and the attempted murder of her other daughter, Josie.

Stone suffers from a severe antisocial personality disorder bordering on the psychotic.

Terrifyingly, he is not alone. There are up to eight men with the same disorder known to the mental health authorities in Birmingham alone, and up to 50 in the Midlands as a whole.

They are not schizophrenics nor mentally ill in the strict medical definition, although they are 15 times more likely to develop a mental illness than others.

Instead, they are damaged men, who have inexplicably lost all conscience, all sense of compassion and all human feeling.

As Ruth Carnall, chief executive of the West Kent Health Authority - responsible for Michael Stone - says: "Was Michael Stone bad or was he mad?

"I have to say with some certainty that Michael Stone was not mad."

Doctors chillingly admit "Michael Stones" could commit the most hideous and despicable crimes without once feeling an ounce of guilt.

And they are terrifying.

Because they can hide their disorder from others, while secretly fantasising about murder. It means we could sit next to a sufferer on the bus and never even know it.

And even if they are identified, doctors say they can never be "repaired".

Because of this, they freely walk the streets unhindered, without help or censure because anyone deemed "untreatable" has no automatic right to a hospital bed.

Home Secretary Jack Straw has announced an investigation into the "treatability" laws and has been praised by mental health groups.

The mental health charity SANE said: "People deemed untreatable are relegated to the criminal justice system after they have committed an offence.

"Yet those who fall into this category may well pose the greatest risk to themselves or others, and early intervention could prevent tragedy. …

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