Theme for the Day

The Birmingham Post (England), April 3, 1998 | Go to article overview

Theme for the Day


Cows played an important part in my early life. One memory is of the awful sound they made when separated from their calves. I often lay awake listening to this.

The poet Charles Causley uses the Cornish dialect word 'helve' to describe it. If you take a deep breath and say 'helve' out loud the sound comes from deep inside. In a small way it makes the pain of separation real.

Christ's sacrifice on the Cross was foretold in Psalm 22, one of the so-called 'Messianic Psalms." There you find the details of Christ's passion, even down to how the Roman soldiers threw dice for his clothes.

It was the first line of Psalm 22 that our Lord cried out from the Cross: "My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?" Why not helve these words with Our Saviour this Good Friday, before joining him in the joy of Easter?

Jane Jones, Sutton Coldfield

FROM THE PAST

200 YEARS AGO: Journeymen collarmakers who are steady and have a good hand may earn good wages and have constant employment by applying to John Langlow, Ludlow, Shropshire.

Aris's Birmingham Gazette, March 1798.

100 YEARS AGO: Mr A.B. Smith (deputy coroner) held an adjourned enquiry at the Freemasons Arms, Newtown, Essington, on the body of William Nicholls (64), of Hobble End, Essington, who was found in a cottage shockingly mutilated by rats on Monday last. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Theme for the Day
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.