Transportation

By Helms, Janel E.; Hinks, Matthew J. et al. | Teaching Children Mathematics, March 2000 | Go to article overview

Transportation


Helms, Janel E., Hinks, Matthew J., Goodman, Michelle V., Leiby, Shelly R., Verna, Luke J., Wetzel, Cheryl A., Teaching Children Mathematics


The "Math by the Month" activities are T designed to appeal directly to students. Students may work on the activities individually or in small groups. No solutions are suggested so that students will look to themselves as the mathematical authority, thereby developing the confidence to validate their work.

This month's activities focus on transportation. Students are involved in various forms of transportation in the world around them. The activities invite students to investigate transportation through data collection, geometry, and measurement.

Janel Helms, teaches third grade and Michelle Goodman, teaches second grade at Muhlenberg Elementary Center, Laureldale, PA 19605. Matthew Hinks teaches in the East Penn School District, Wescosville, PA 18106. Shelly Leiby teaches seventh-grade mathematics at Hamburg Middle School, Hamburg, PA 19526. Luke Verna teaches fifth grade at Upper Perkiomen Middle School, East Greenville, PA 18041. Cheryl Wetzel teaches at Wescosville Elementary School, Wescosville, PA 18106.

Reference

Siebert, Diane. Truck Song. New York: HarperCollins Children's Books, 1987.

WEEKLY ACTIVITIES

TRANSPORTATION: K-2 MARCH 2000

Truckin'. Read Truck Song (Siebert 1987). Why do you think that trucks are important? Use pattern blocks or paper shapes to make a model of an eighteen-wheeler. Create models of other forms of transportation. Can you name the blocks that you used?

A "lot" of graphing. Your school parking lot holds a large amount of mathematics. Using the vehicles on the school lot, create graphs that show types of vehicles, colors of vehicles, or numbers of wheels. Which type of vehicle was shown most often on the graph? Least often? Why do you think this difference occurred? How many different types of graphs can you create with a "lot"?

Bike it! Use a bicycle, or its front tire, to measure distances in and around your school. Measure the circumference of the front tire, and mark a point on the tire where it touches the ground. Roll the bicycle down the hall. Count the number of times that the wheel turns, and calculate the length of the hall. Measure other distances. Would your results be the same using a different-sized bicycle?

What goes past your school? Predict what types of vehicles go past your school, such as buses, two-door cars, vans, and bicycles. Watch fifty vehicles passing your school, and record how many of each kind passes. Which types of vehicles passed by most often and least often? Would your results be different on a different day of the week? In what way?

WEEKLY ACTIVITIES

TRANSPORTATION: 3--4 MARCH 2000

6 Gasoline graph. Keep track of how much gasoline your family buys in two weeks. Record the cost, number of gallons, and dates of purchase. Compare your information with that of other students in your class, and graph the class's data. On which day of the week did most of the families buy gasoline? …

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