Political Factions Are Destroying Our Systems

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), December 16, 2019 | Go to article overview

Political Factions Are Destroying Our Systems


Political factions are destroying our systems

James Madison would be rolling in his grave at the current mess of our political systems. With identity politics becoming more prevalent, the polarization of the parties has done nothing but grow a gap that will be very difficult to close. Compromise is a fever dream; I find myself wondering if it would even be possible in today's political world.

The parties are pitted against one another; they are defined by factions that do little but divide the parties morally. Factions no longer influence our political systems, they define them. And this is exactly why Madison would be extremely disappointed.

In Federalist 10, Madison wrote, "Among the numerous advantages promised by a well-constructed Union, none deserves to be more accurately developed than its tendency to break and control the violence of faction." He, even in 1787, could accurately see and assess the importance of the factions not leading the legislative processes within our government. When they hold too much power, the legislation can easily be adverse to the interest of the country and her citizens.

Some people may argue that the jobs of factions within government are important to ensure equality, and this, I can agree to. Although, I find it concerning that our framers had enough concern over the power of factions to develop a government that limits them and now, these very factions control the government. The roles faced a total reversal.

I think our political parties need to place more focus on defending and developing rights, rather than dividing the American citizens based on their demographics. That is a concerning trend that needs to stop before "We the people" becomes an outdated phrase.

Carolynne Burk

Mundelein

Congress must do what is right: Impeach, remove

Our country and democracy itself, are facing one of the most significant challenges since the Civil War. Our democracy and the rule of law are under attack from within aided by foreign adversaries. Our current administration 1) openly defies the rule of law, 2) obstructs explicit Constitutional authority of Congressional oversight, 3) openly works to advance the interests of foreign governments, 4) openly invites foreign governments to meddle in our elections and 5) openly embraces and spreads verified Russian propaganda.

Sadly, these assertions are fact. We find ourselves in the middle of a monumental struggle for the survival of our representative democracy established by our Founding Fathers. Will we survive as a representative democracy or descend into an authoritarian form of rule or dictatorship?

If they succeed to destroy our democracy and are not held accountable, this will only enhance the swamp Trump promised to drain. This will significantly deepen the already polarized political environment. It is up to us. We must stand up against this abusive and corrupt administration, starting with the impeachment and removal of the president of the United States and hold accountable those in his ad-ministration and the GOP members that support his "abuse of power" and "obstruction of Congress."

We must remind the president, senators and representatives that they took an oath to preserve, protect and defend the Constitution against all enemies foreign and domestic, not a loyalty oath to the president or party. We must call on the members of the Republican Party to reject Russian propaganda, reject the destruction of our democracy for political power and uphold their solemn oath of office.

They must to do what they know is morally right: Impeach and remove Donald Trump and those in his administration who enable his behavior. We will remember and vote.

David and Michelle Johnson

Geneva

Truth about Dems will come out in Senate trial

There may not be many of us in favor of the Democrats in the House impeaching the President, but as a conservative Republican, I am all in favor of impeachment. …

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