8 Stunning Bookstores Worth Visiting around the World; Books Have Always Had the Ability to Transport Readers, Whisking Them Away to Faraway Lands. Cozy Up and Plot Your Next Getaway at These Unique Bookstores around the World

By Powers, Laura | Newsweek, December 13, 2019 | Go to article overview

8 Stunning Bookstores Worth Visiting around the World; Books Have Always Had the Ability to Transport Readers, Whisking Them Away to Faraway Lands. Cozy Up and Plot Your Next Getaway at These Unique Bookstores around the World


Powers, Laura, Newsweek


Byline: Laura Powers

Not Just Fiction: Real-Life Bookstores Worth Visiting Books have always had the ability to transport readers, whisking them away to faraway lands. Bookstores are often the inspiration for this magic, allowing readers to scan the shelves in pursuit of their next escape. Some bookstores are taking this to the next level, making the store itself the destination--through architecture, decor and even optical illusions. Cozy up and plot your next getaway at these unique bookstores around the world.

Housing Works Bookstore is one of the most quintessentially New York bookshops, second only to the Strand. Part of a non-profit chain donating its proceeds to combat AIDS and homelessness, the spiral staircases leading to a second floor balcony of books gives the feeling of an old-school library in the heart of New York's chic SoHo district.

This 1919 theater-turned-cinema-turned-bookstore epitomizes the connection between the performing arts and books. It retains the frescoed ceiling, ornate trim, and velvet curtains of the former theater, and books line the walls, including where the audience once sat in box seats.

Tangier was the home of many famed writers of the '50s and '60s, and Librairie des Colonnes was a regular haunt of Paul Bowles, William S. Burroughs, Tennessee Williams, Truman Capote, and others. The bookstore still mostly features titles in French but it also houses Spanish, English, and, increasingly, more Arabic works, and even publishes its own books.

This floating bookstore in the Regents Canal is known as "The London Bookbarge. …

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8 Stunning Bookstores Worth Visiting around the World; Books Have Always Had the Ability to Transport Readers, Whisking Them Away to Faraway Lands. Cozy Up and Plot Your Next Getaway at These Unique Bookstores around the World
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