Travel: Carolina Cruising; A French Chateau, the Lure of Lake Lure, the Porridgemobile and Attempted Suicide by Whitewater Rafting. Ah Yes, Must Be GEOFF HILL in North Carolina

The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), March 2, 2000 | Go to article overview

Travel: Carolina Cruising; A French Chateau, the Lure of Lake Lure, the Porridgemobile and Attempted Suicide by Whitewater Rafting. Ah Yes, Must Be GEOFF HILL in North Carolina


OK, here's the quiz. North Carolina is famous for: a) Even less than Belgium b) Being north of South Carolina c) Don't know.

The answer is, in fact, all three, so here is a potted history.

Geography: Sea to east, Appalachian mountains to west. Mountains once 40,000 feet high, but now suffering from old age, so highest is 6,684 feet Mount Mitchell, named after professor who fell off while measuring it in 1857.

At foot of mountains is oldest river in US, called New River.

Natural history: North Carolina only natural home of Venus flytrap. As a result voted least popular destination with flies worldwide.

Also home of rare ruby-throated hummingbird, which eats more than half its weight every day, a habit adopted by many Americans.

History: North Carolina discovered by English in 1585. English greeted by pleasant, helpful Indians. English murder pleasant, helpful Indians, move in, refuse to pay tax to England. English become Americans, and refuse to pay tax to each other. More fighting. Civil war (which Carolinians refer to with delightful coyness as The Late Unpleasantness). More fighting. Civil war ends. North Carolina discovers tobacco and banking, in that order. Venus flytrap adopted as official plant of American lawyers.

The present. And me in it, driving west in a hire car towards the mountain from which Dr Elisha Mitchell plunged in 1857.

Like most hire cars, mine was so bland that five seconds after getting into it I forgot what make it was. Not only that, but it was a nag. Do anything wrong, and a light would flash on saying ''Fasten your seatbelt! The door's open! You've left the lights on! That tie doesn't suit you!'' accompanied by one of those bleeping sounds designed by men in white coats to be so melodious and pleasant that it was, in fact, deeply irritating.

Driving it, I thought after half an hour, was like making love to porridge: an image so disturbing that I turned on the radio to blank it out. The radio had all three types of music: country, western and elevator. I turned it off.

Thankfully, after driving for a couple of hours I found myself in a boat in the middle of Lake Lure with a glass of Chablis, surrounded by water, pine trees and sunset, and on the way to dinner.

It was, in short, so idyllic that I resolved there and then to retire here. Unfortunately, I suddenly realised I had a girlfriend, job, house and cat to consider, so resolved instead to phone girlfriend and tell her to call work, sell house, grab cat and get out here. Tragically, when I got to the restaurant and called home it was engaged.

Disconsolate, I returned to the Lodge at Lake Lure, where I was staying, spent the evening alternately scratching Chips and Muffin, the resident labradors, and went to bed.

The next morning, since I was still in a job, I went off to explore the area's two man-made attractions. The less obvious of these is Lake Lure itself, created by Dr Lucius B Morse, who rode his horse into the area in 1900 seeking a cure for his tuberculosis in the clear mountain air.

What he found instead was a paradise of wooded hills, rushing rivers and towering rocks, which he immediately determined in the best American tradition to turn into a theme park.

Today, the good doctor's vision lives on: you can still hike his trails, breathe his air and either climb his mountain or ride up the middle of it in his elevator, which last year had its 50th birthday party. With elevator music, naturally.

Haven't time to visit it? Just watch The Last of the Mohicans, which was filmed there.

Twelve years before Dr Morse had his vision, however, George Washington Vanderbilt had quite a different one just down the road.

In 1888, 26-year-old George was the quiet one of the family, more interested in touring around Europe studying French Renaissance architecture than adding to the family's $200 million dollar fortune. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Travel: Carolina Cruising; A French Chateau, the Lure of Lake Lure, the Porridgemobile and Attempted Suicide by Whitewater Rafting. Ah Yes, Must Be GEOFF HILL in North Carolina
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.