LAST NIGHT; Fast Show Pair Moved Too Slowly to Be Funny

By Morgan, Kathleen | Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), December 28, 1998 | Go to article overview

LAST NIGHT; Fast Show Pair Moved Too Slowly to Be Funny


Morgan, Kathleen, Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland)


TED AND RALPH (BBC2)

FANS of The Fast Show would have been in heaven as they were treated to 70 minutes of two of the comedy's most popular characters, Ted and Ralph.

But unless you were a hardened devotee of the sketch show, this one-off special was 60 minutes too long.

Paul Whitehouse and Charlie Higson have won the affection of millions of viewers with their skit on upper-class life.

Ralph is a witless, rich landowner who has no-one for company but Ted, his lowly Irish handyman. The running joke is that Ted knows his place - as a superior being to his dim boss.

Their antics are enough to make you laugh out loud, at least for the first few minutes, so the pair must have looked promising as stars of a feature-length special.

After all, Govan street philosopher Rab C. Nesbitt began life as a character in a Naked Video sketch. But he got his own series and, after a decade of shows, the loveable drunk looks like he might just limp into the next millennium.

But where Rab's life is cut into neat, half-hour slices and enlivened by the presence of family and friends, Ted and Ralph looked like lonely souls unable to prop up a lengthy show by themselves.

The whole point of The Fast Show was that it switched between short sketches at lightning speed, keeping the viewer hooked.

This slow-moving special plodded along at snail's pace, as Ted and Ralph went about their daily business.

There was the odd gem that hinted at Whitehouse and Higson's genius, but the sparklers were buried in a show that was just too long.

Ralph had four weeks to find a wife - or lose his house to his nearest female relative.

The high-class buffoon chose a porn magnate's party as his hunting ground, but was outshone by Ted.

That was the highlight of a mildly-amusing comedy that must have looked so promising to BBC bosses.

The pair are brilliant in bite-sized chunks, but they floundered when they were stretched to full capacity.

Sometimes less is more, lads.

SOAPWATCH

EASTENDERS (BBC1, 7.30pm)

THE day of reckoning has come for Grant, who is in court for his bail hearing. These are tense times, too, for brother Phil and mum Peggy (Steve McFadden and Barbara Windsor, left) as Phil clashes with Beppe and Peggy begins to doubt her Grant's innocence.

MOVIES

MIRACLE OF THE BELLS (BBC2, 6.10am - 8.05am) When a movie queen is laid to rest in her coalmining hometown, a small miracle takes place. Or does it? Trite sentimental drama, based on a screenplay by the great Ben Hecht. He may have been joking but the cast - including Frank Sinatra as a young priest - takes it seriously. With Fred MacMurray, Lee J Cobb 1948

YOUNG AT HEART (BBC2, 8.05am - 10.00am) While her sisters make ga-ga eyes at songwriter Gig Young, Doris Day has her head turned by grumpy pianist Frank Sinatra. Slick musical remake of Fannie Hurt's cosy small- town drama `Four Daughters'. Songs include `Someone to Watch Over Me' and `Just One of Those Things'. With Ethel Barrymore 1954

LASSIE'S GREAT ADVENTURE (Channel 5, 8.25am - 10.20am) Hardly great, but it is an adventure - Lassie gets blown out of a hot air balloon over the Canadian wilderness. Help arrives in the outsize form of mute Indian Richard Kiel (tin-teethed Jaws in Bond films). With June Lockhart 1963

LITTLE GIANTS (ITV, 10.20am - 12.20pm) Tired of the taunts of his small- town sporting-hero brother, Rick Moranis coaches a bunch of no-hoper kids - to take on his brother's team for a place in the local football league. Raucous, good-humoured comedy for children, with enough character and incident to keep grown-ups from grumbling 1994

THE BLACK HOLE (BBC1, 10.30am - 12.00 noon) Disney's nonsensical outer space adventure with a star cast glumly going through the motions. And the black hole isn't even black - it's red and sometimes blue. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

LAST NIGHT; Fast Show Pair Moved Too Slowly to Be Funny
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.