Italy's Square Deal; LAST NIGHT'S VIEW

By Purnell, Tony | The Mirror (London, England), November 11, 1997 | Go to article overview

Italy's Square Deal; LAST NIGHT'S VIEW


Purnell, Tony, The Mirror (London, England)


No danger of Albert Square's outing to Italy upsetting the locals.

When EastEnders (BBC1) went to Ireland it depicted the Oirish as dirty, rude, and drunk.

The jaunt to the Emerald Isle led to a grovelling apology but they have learnt their lesson.

Ian Beale's visit to Milan in search of runaway wife Cindy - which is scheduled to last all week - is more likely to qualify for a thank you letter from the Italian Tourist Board.

The scenery was wonderful, the sun shone and church bells rang.

And the people Ian (Adam Woodyatt) and private investigator Ros encountered were as nice as pizza.

The two stayed in a picturesque small hotel and took breakfast on the terrace overlooking the lake. The greasy spoon in Albert Square was a million miles away.

"If I can help in any way please ask," said Roberto, their dishy host- cum-waiter whose crisp pink shirt matched the tablecloths.

He sympathised with Ian over his plight to get his sons back.

"A father should be with his children," he said. I swear I heard violins.

Even bureaucracy had a friendly face. The first thing an official asked when Ian called to attempt to sort out the red tape was: "Can I get you something? Tea perhaps?" There was none of that sort of thing in Ireland.

Mind you, things turned ugly later when The Mitchell Bruvvers arrived but they brought it on themselves.

Adam Woodyatt tried to look surprised, but he appears to have forgotten everything he was taught at drama school. He did not even get up from his seat.

You could have knocked him down - but you'd have needed a Centurion Tank to do it.

"Thought you might need a bit of help," explained Phil (Steve McFadden). …

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