XS Travel; Hawaii Live-O!

By Bissett, Matt | Sunday Mail (Glasgow, Scotland), April 20, 1997 | Go to article overview

XS Travel; Hawaii Live-O!


Bissett, Matt, Sunday Mail (Glasgow, Scotland)


Suntanned muscles ripple like the bright blue waves below as hundreds of surfers take the plunge on Waikiki Beach.

This is a surfers' Mecca. Surfing was invented here on the seven islands that make up the American state of Hawaii. And on Oahu - the most popular of them - Waikiki Beach is never empty.

World champion-ships are held here and any surfer worth his salt will make the pilgrimage at some point.

Of course, the one-and-a-half miles of soft white sand are also perfect for sunbathing. And if you aren't intimidated by the lithe bodies of the men or the sleek, bikinied blondes who flock round them, nobody's going to mind if you simply lie back and take in the view.

There's only one thing a surfer likes more than winning the war with the waves - and that's to have lots of people watch him do it.

But if it all gets too much, you could always wander off round the beautiful Ko'olau mountain waterfalls nearby. Or you can walk to the 760ft crater rim of Diamond Head, the famous volcanic mountain, named when a group of foolish 19th century English sailors thought they'd struck it lucky and charged off to sell boxes of worthless crystals to the locals.

Waikiki beach skirts round Honolulu, the capital of Hawaii, where there are lots of wonderful old museums and state buildings - and, of course, Pearl Harbour.

Things are a lot quieter round here. In fact, most of your tour will be in awe and respectful silence as ex-servicemen take you round the tourist centre. They'll show you old news footage and the special memorial in the harbour, set up to remember the 2,300 men who died when Japan bombed the naval base in 1941.

Much more cheerful is the vast array of bars and restaurants back on the beach in Oahu, where you can try the amazing local dishes.

Freshly-caught seafood (the red snapper and sea bass is out of this world) and the locally-grown avocados and mangos - all washed down with a rum Mai Tai cocktail or the famous local Kona Coffee. Then you can hit the clubs on Waikiki Beach, or take in some hula dancing, complete with your orchid lei (flower garland) round your neck, garish Hawaiian shirt and a few strains from South Pacific played under the whispering palm trees.

Most visitors head for Oahu and stay in one of the big tourist complexes - which, since they cater mainly for Americans - are larger than life.

The incredible Hilton Waikoloa Beach Hotel is the biggest, set in 62 acres of tropical gardens with 1,241 rooms and a three-quarter acre pool - but there are smaller, more private, places to be found.

There are also an increasing number of guest houses where you can forgive anything when you're surrounded by palms just a few feet from the beach.

It would be easy to spend all your holiday on Oahu, but many venture out to visit Maui - a stunning tropical island which is becoming very trendy - or the Big Island itself, confusingly called Hawaii. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

XS Travel; Hawaii Live-O!
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.