I Can't Stand Harriet Harman' Our Girl Power Pride!

By Harkess, Janette | Sunday Mail (Glasgow, Scotland), June 8, 1997 | Go to article overview

I Can't Stand Harriet Harman' Our Girl Power Pride!


Harkess, Janette, Sunday Mail (Glasgow, Scotland)


Invading forces have been at work in Parliament. Slowly but surely, they've seeped into the corridors of power and amassed on the green leather Commons benches.

They're called women.

They speak in the same debates, take part in the same votes and claim the same office expenses as their male counterparts.

It's a shining example of the kind of equality the Suffragettes threw themselves in front of Derby horses and chained themselves to the railings for.

Yet, if Tony Blair and his Girl Power groupies get the green light for their ministry for women, they - along with the rest of us - will be plunged into a Dark Ages time slip of separatism and sexism.

Call in Scully and Mulder...

Let's open the fairer seX-Files!

For years, we girls have been fighting our way out of the slipstream and into the mainstream.

Now the Government's Girl Power forum, headed by Harriet Harman, wants to put us well and truly back into the stagnating, impotent pond we inhabited for centuries.

Much as I disliked Mrs Thatcher, she proved women are more than capable of handling the ultimate power trip - through the door of Number Ten.

But for all her faults (and they are legion) she made it perfectly clear that wearing a skirt doesn't hamper your brain activity.

The Iron Lady ruled the nation through wars and want . I'd have liked to see the charred remains of the person who told her she didn't have the balls for it.

Yet, here we now have the Women's Unit - as it has been named.

This proposed hive of activity is supposedly going to promote female- friendly policies.

Sounds great in theory, but what ground, I wonder, will `female-friendly' end up covering?

It shouldn't be the problems of jobless single mums, the education debate or the childcare crisis.

My recall of school biology is ropey but I seeme to recall that MEN share half the job of creating kids. …

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