PULP FICTION! BRANSON BINS BOOK ABOUT DI MURDER PLOT; Novel about Bid to Kill Princess in Car Crash Is Banned in Britain but America Fights for Rights

By Gardner, Barry; McQUEEN, Alastair | The People (London, England), October 12, 1997 | Go to article overview

PULP FICTION! BRANSON BINS BOOK ABOUT DI MURDER PLOT; Novel about Bid to Kill Princess in Car Crash Is Banned in Britain but America Fights for Rights


Gardner, Barry, McQUEEN, Alastair, The People (London, England)


Virgin boss Richard Branson has banned a sensational book which has assassins trying to kill Princess Diana in a car crash.

Outraged Branson pulped the novel Royal Blood - which had a haunting picture of Diana caught in a sniper's sights on the cover.

But the American publishing trade - which printed the full transcript of Andrew Morton's controversial Diana tapes - has swept into a bidding frenzy for rights to the book.

Branson, a close friend of Diana, had agreed to publish the book months before her tragic death.

Promotional material was prepared as SAS hero-turned author Barry Davies finalised a bizarre storyline featuring a contract killer firing a poison- tipped bullet at Diana.

It was due in British bookshops just days after Diana and Dodi Fayed were killed in the horrific Paris smash.

But within hours of the accident Davies was ordered by Virgin Publishing to keep the thriller project secret even though the company had pushed it as a prime project.

Angry Davies, who wrote the book months before Diana died, then retrieved the shocking manuscript and hawked it around the States.

And he is still on the verge of a million dollar deal for the book which tells how the Princess was killed because she planned to marry a Muslim.

The book caused a storm earlier this year when it was revealed the plot ended with pregnant Diana being hit by an AIDS-infected ice bullet fired from a deadly crossbow, which doomed her to a lonely, lingering death.

Virgin demanded changes when details were leaked - and AIDS charities which had been supported by the Princess led a storm of protest.

Branson, who often invited Diana to stay on his exclusive Virgin Islands paradise of Necker, was also believed to be embarrassed by the AIDS reference. The author re-wrote crucial passages changing the lethal virus to Ebola, an untreatable disease which turns human organs to mush.

And he introduced an American hero who dramatically acts as a human shield to take the fatal shot.

The new version ends with the head of a shady right-wing organisation called the Sovereign Committee, which ordered renegade SAS men to carry out the failed royal hit, stomping around his garden, hissing: "Next time we'll have her killed in a car crash."

Intelligence agencies and elite regiments including the SAS are regularly taught how to cause car smashes and make them look like accidents.

Last week French police said they were hunting a mystery car they believe may have caused the high-speed crash that killed Diana, 36, Dodi, 42 and chauffeur Henri Paul.

Several witnesses have told investigators how a Fiat Uno could have hit the Mercedes as it hurtled into the tunnel at high speed causing it to plough into a concrete pillar.

Davies, who has helped train royal bodyguards as well as secret service agents, said: "Everything in the plot is feasible. I know that from my security experience.

"The crossbow in the book is like something out of Star Wars and leaves no trace. I tested one for the regiment and I know these things are possible.

"In real life Diana was monitored by the security services and did put herself at risk when she gave them the slip.

"Wherever possible I have used real events. The two rogue SAS assassins are certainly based on people I knew from active service."

A colleague added: "The fact that the new ending has a plot to kill Diana in a car crash is purely coincidental.

"It was written long before she died. This is simply a writer spinning a thrilling yarn." The re-written book was finished early in July and 52-year-old Davies was told it would be on the shelves by September 18.

Then on August 31 came the tragic car crash as Henri Paul tried to outrun paparazzi photographers in a Mercedes limousine. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

PULP FICTION! BRANSON BINS BOOK ABOUT DI MURDER PLOT; Novel about Bid to Kill Princess in Car Crash Is Banned in Britain but America Fights for Rights
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.