Moving Mountains for Scotland's Kids

By Samson, Peter | Sunday Mail (Glasgow, Scotland), May 26, 1996 | Go to article overview

Moving Mountains for Scotland's Kids


Samson, Peter, Sunday Mail (Glasgow, Scotland)


The room is quiet and the lights burn late into the night.

It's not long since its occupant came back from a fortnight on holiday at a secret hideaway - and even then he was working.

Surrounded by mountains of documents, 60-year-old William Douglas Cullen has had just one topic on his mind. This week's Dunblane inquiry.

As Lord Cullen, the High Court judge, he heads the probe into the massacre by gun freak Thomas Hamilton that left 16 schoolchildren and their teacher dead.

He'll also examine school security, and how adults run youth groups.

More than that, he carries the hopes of the families of the Dunblane victims who are anxious to see a tightening of firearms laws.

The Government want to hear his views before they consider new laws.

Since he was appointed, Lord Cullen has immersed himself in the preparation for the inquiry that starts on Wednesday in Stirling's Albert Halls. He is said to have locked himself away in a room for the massive task of reading up on all the current legislation.

Politicians from all parties have praised Cullen's talent as an investigator.

And he's no stranger to tragedy. From 1988 to 1990, he chaired the inquiry into the catastrophic explosion on the Piper Alpha oil platform.

Most people agreed he did a splendid job. …

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