GO FOR A BURTON; Taylor-Made for Fun Down Mexico Way

By Law, Alan | The Mirror (London, England), November 23, 1996 | Go to article overview

GO FOR A BURTON; Taylor-Made for Fun Down Mexico Way


Law, Alan, The Mirror (London, England)


If Eduardo's to be believed, Puerto Vallarta's booming tourist industry is all down to Liz Taylor and Richard Burton.

It was their on-off romance here during filming of Night Of The Iguana in the Sixties that attractedthe world's paparazzi.

And the world fell in love with their pictures - not of the Burtons, our guide adds, but of the backdrops.

Here on the west coast of Mexico, the photographers have long gone but the tourists keep coming.

For some, the pink bridge that spans the cobbled road between the stars' separate houses (built to placate Burton's then wife, who threatened him with the direst of consequences if he moved in with "that woman") is a must-visit.

For others, the main attraction is the rain forest, teeming with wildlife, and miles of often deserted beaches lapped by the warm Pacific.

From the beach you can watch hump-back whales rise out of the sea not 150 yards away. They come here to the Bahia de Banderas, one of the largest bays in the world, to give birth.

Barely an arm's length away, tiny hummingbirds in iridescent blue, green, purple and rainbow plumage hover round the scarlet hibiscus blooms.

Tourism provides 85 per cent of Puerto Vallarta's 300,000 inhabitants with jobs, so visitors are made extremely welcome.

For shoppers, the best buys are silver jewellery, leather goods, shoes and women's clothes, especially summer and beach dresses.

The range of silver is mind-boggling. The factory shop in the town centre has more than 10,000 items on display, and they are changed every week. …

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