In Which Department or College of a University Should Sport Studies (Sport Management, Sport Administration, Etc.) Be Taught?

JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, March 2000 | Go to article overview

In Which Department or College of a University Should Sport Studies (Sport Management, Sport Administration, Etc.) Be Taught?


I firmly believe that this area of study should be taught in the departments of human performance, sport and leisure studies, or sports management, and not in schools of business. Here in the Department of Human Performance, Sport and Leisure Studies at Metropolitan State College of Denver, we offer a new and unique major emphasis entitled "Sport Industry Operations." Within this emphasis, we offer only the "business" side of sport: we teach subjects such as liability, venue operations, administration day-of-game studies, and prepare our students to write business plans and do computer research in areas of sport promotions, marketing, sales, insurance, and risk management. At the same time, we have forged a formal agreement with the MSCD School of Business to require all of our majors in Sport Industry Operations to minor in an area of study in the School of Business.

This combination gives our students an extremely strong academic and practical course of study. A full-term 10-credit-hour (450-clock-hour) internship is strongly recommended as the capstone experience for our seniors. MSCD realized that the Human Performance, Sport and Leisure Studies department faculty had the best practical and professional experiences to direct academic study in this area. The School of Business faculty also realized that such an area of study was necessary and that the business minor requirement would help them be a valuable part of our students' academic studies. We now have over 110 students majoring in the SIO emphasis and taking a minor concentration in the School of Business, with at least 10 students scheduled to do their internships each academic term now through 2002.

In my professional experiences over the last 30 years, starting out as a physical educator, coach, sports administrator, and now risk-management and liability consultant, I have concluded that our profession has the best knowledge and experience to provide such an area of study.

Marc A. Rabinoff, professor, Department of Human Performance, Sport and Leisure Studies, Metropolitan State College, Denver, CO 80217.

This question is quite interesting in that I can see only one legitimate answer: "sport studies" must be taught in the department that actually studies sport, the department of physical education (or kinesiology, or human performance, etc.). The reason for this is quite simple. One must possess knowledge of sports and of their management in order to teach within this area. I do believe, however, that the physical education department should work in conjunction with the business department in developing a strong minor in administration, marketing, or management to provide the student with the requisite skills for the workforce.

Steven R. Murray, assistant professor, Department of Human Performance and Wellness, Mesa State College, Grand Junction, CO 81502.

From 1975 to 1985, I taught at a New Zealand university where all of the sport studies courses were taught within what was known as the School of Physical Education. For the last ten years of my career, I have taught at an American university where all of the sport studies courses are taught in a Department of Physical Education attached to a College of Education and Professional Studies. The Humanities Division of this university also offers a university-wide course in the sociology of sport and another in the history of sport.

I would argue that sport studies has been, and always will be, an interdisciplinary subject. Given the multifaceted nature of sport studies, my hope is that institutions offering sport studies play to their strengths. …

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In Which Department or College of a University Should Sport Studies (Sport Management, Sport Administration, Etc.) Be Taught?
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