Just like Old Times, Caps Get Penguins

By Elfin, David | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 10, 2000 | Go to article overview

Just like Old Times, Caps Get Penguins


Elfin, David, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


What was the Washington Capitals' reward for their best regular season in 14 years and the NHL's top record over the past 100 days? It's another playoff matchup with the Pittsburgh Penguins, their tormentor of so many springs past.

The Caps and Penguins met five times in six postseasons from 1991 to 1996 with Pittsburgh winning four of those series. What's more, Washington blew 3-1 leads in 1992 and 1996, losing both Game 7s at home and falling in a four-overtime classic in Game 5 at home in 1996.

"I just kind of laughed about it when I realized it was Pittsburgh again," said left wing Steve Konowalchuk, one of eight Caps to have faced the Penguins in the playoffs. "It's one of those `it figures' kind of things. But I'm not going to lose any sleep because of what happened in the past."

Neither are Konowalchuk's fellow Caps-Penguins alumni.

"It's not like we're fearing them," Caps defenseman Ken Klee said. "We have to just keep playing our game, win our games at home and take care of business."

However, the Caps haven't done that against the Penguins this season. Pittsburgh won three of the four meetings, joining Northeast Division champion Toronto as the only Eastern Conference teams to take the season series from Southeast Division winner Washington. In the teams' only matchup since Feb. 1, Pittsburgh won 4-3 in overtime on March 30 at MCI Center. The Penguins, despite the absence of NHL scoring leader Jaromir Jagr, scored three power-play goals against the Caps' highly rated penalty killing unit.

"They're a little more offensive-minded than we are," said defenseman Calle Johansson, who joins ailing right wing Peter Bondra as the only remaining Caps from the 1991 and 1992 teams that lost to the eventual Stanley Cup champion Penguins. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Just like Old Times, Caps Get Penguins
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.