Disappearing Languages: Atlases, Links, and Scholars

By Parizeau, Nicole | Whole Earth, Spring 2000 | Go to article overview

Disappearing Languages: Atlases, Links, and Scholars


Parizeau, Nicole, Whole Earth


ATLAS OF THE WORLD'S
LANGUAGES IN DANGER
OF DISAPPEARING

Stephen A. Wurm, ed. 1996;
60 pp. FF70 (approx. US$12)
(100FF/US$17 postpaid).
UNESCO Publishing/Pacific
Linguistics, 7 place de
Fontenay, 75352 Paris 07 SP,
France. +(33) 1-45-68-10-00.

UNESCO has mapped
imperiled languages across
the globe. Also published in
French and Spanish.

"VOICES OF THE WORLD"
CULTURAL
TRANSMIGRATION MAP

Approximately 32" x 20 ".
Supplement to August 1999
issue of National
Geographic. Back issue $5
postpaid. National
Geographic Society, PO Box
11650, Des Moines, IA
50350. 888/225-5647,
www.nationalgeographic.com.

This bright and lucid
National Gee map is a visual
symphony of the world's vanishing
languages. The danger
couldn't be more clear.

NATIVE LANGUAGES AND
LANGUAGE FAMILIES OF
NORTH AMERICA MAP

1999. Folded study map,
22.5 "x 20 ", $14.95 ($18.95
postpaid); wall map, 50" x
38", $19.95 ($23.95 postpaid).
Smithsonian
Institution. University of
Nebraska Press, 312 North
14th Street, Lincoln, NE
68588. 800/755-1105,
402/472-3584,
pressmail@unl.edu,
www.nebraskapress.unl.edu.

North American Indian
languages mapped at the
time of first European contact.
Both the small and wall
versions of the map come
with a full classification
table. THE map for bioregional
history.

LESS COMMONLY TAUGHT
LANGUAGES PROJECT

University of Minnesota,
Center for Advanced
Research on Language
Acquisition (CARLA), 333
Appleby Hall, 128 Pleasant
Street SE, Minneapolis, MN
55455. 612/626-8600,
carla@tc.umn.edu,
http://carla.acad.umn.edu
/lctl/lctl.html.

CARLA makes it easier
and more enticing to teach
and learn less-commonly
taught languages. Course
offerings, video archives,
links, technology, organizations,
and contacts.

TEACHING INDIGENOUS
LANGUAGES

Jon Reyhner, Bilingual
Multicultural Education,
Northern Arizona University,
PO Box 5677, Flagstaff, AZ
86011. … 

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