President Buoyed by Opinion Polls; Clinton May Seek Deal to Avoid Impeachment

The Birmingham Post (England), September 23, 1998 | Go to article overview

President Buoyed by Opinion Polls; Clinton May Seek Deal to Avoid Impeachment


President Bill Clinton, buoyed by a favourable opinion poll, may now seek a deal with Congress to avoid impeachment proceedings.

In an effort to slow the impeachment train on Capitol Hill, White House aides are contacting congressional Democrats, hoping to persuade them to speak out in favour of a presidential punishment which falls short of impeachment.

Senate Majority Leader Mr Trent Lott said yesterday that President Clinton should go to Capitol Hill and answer questions, but queried whether it would change anything.

"Any time the president comes forward and comes clean in a formal setting it would probably be a positive development," said Mr Lott.

The problem, he said, is what happens after that.

"The whole thing is demeaning for the country," Mr Lott said, blaming President Clinton for allowing the controversy to drag on so long.

"It's just sad. I don't know of any other way to describe it."

Struggling to digest a historic but wrenching avalanche of testimony, the people who now hold President Clinton's future in their hands say he may have gained some sympathy with the television airing of his grand jury testimony.

But while no one says the nationally televised spectacle severely damaged President Clinton, neither do lawmakers suggest his troubles will go away.

One Democratic senator says he is absorbing details under the assumption he will sit as juror in an impeachment trial.

"As a member of the US Senate, I'm a potential juror in this case," said Senator Mr Robert Torricelli, for years one of Clinton's staunchest defenders on Capitol Hill. "Whatever affections I've held for Bill Clinton are entirely eclipsed by my sense of responsibility."

President Clinton's standing rose slightly in one public opinion poll taken after the videotape of his testimony was released, and fewer people thought he should be impeached. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

President Buoyed by Opinion Polls; Clinton May Seek Deal to Avoid Impeachment
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.