Finding the Funds


Staying aware of the primary funding streams for adult education programs is half the battle in making them long-lasting and successful. The majority of funding stems from two pieces of federal legislation that provide opportunities and valuable resources to develop and expand programs.

The Adult Education and Family Literacy Act, 1998

The Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) provides grants to states and other eligible entities based on the population of adults 16 and over who are no longer in school and do not have a high school diploma or equivalent. States distribute grants to local providers, including local education agencies, community-based organizations, volunteer literacy programs, institutions of higher education, public and non-profit organizations, libraries, public housing authorities or consortia of organizations listed above. More than 4 million adults and out-of-school youth participate in federally supported adult education programs.

The AEFLA supports adult basic education instruction, adult secondary education, English as a second language, family literacy, workplace literacy and prison literacy programs. Special funding is provided for national leadership and the National Institute for Literacy.

Federal resources strengthen state efforts, in part by requiring a 25 percent match of state support. Without federal funding, many states would have no adult education program

--Education Budget Alert for Fiscal Year 2000, The Committee for Education Funding

The Workforce Investment Act, 1998

The Workforce Investment Act (WIA) provides the framework for a unique national workforce preparation and employment system designed to meet the needs of both the nation's businesses and job seekers and those who want to further their careers. Title I of the legislation dictates:

* Training and employment programs must be designed and managed at the local level where the needs of businesses or individuals are best understood

* Customers must be able to conveniently access the employment, education, training and information services they need at a single location near home

* Customers should have choices in selecting the training program that best fits their needs and the organizations that will provide that service; they should have control over their own career development

* Customers have a right to information about how well training providers prepare people for jobs; training providers will provide information on their success rates

* Businesses will provide information and leadership, and will play an active role in ensuring that the system prepares people for current and future jobs. …

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