Safer Modes of Pest Control - Pest Control without Toxic Pesticides

By Hatherill, J. Robert | The World and I, May 2000 | Go to article overview

Safer Modes of Pest Control - Pest Control without Toxic Pesticides


Hatherill, J. Robert, The World and I


Here are some practical tips to control pests in the home and garden, circumventing the use of harmful pesticides.

Beneficial insects. In the yard and garden, take advantage of beneficial insects and other predators, such as lacewings, ladybug beetles, predatory mites, parasitic wasps, and spiders. Support these creatures by growing appropriate plants, such as clover, white lace flower, evening primrose, cilantro, fennel, caraway, dill, flowering buckwheat, white yarrow, and tansy.

Fleas. On pets, use flea combs and traps, and bathe pets often with mild shampoos. Some flea traps attract fleas to a light source and immobilize them on sticky paper. In pet bedding, use eucalyptus, rosemary, and bay leaves to deter fleas. You may also use supplements (garlic, sulfur, zinc) or commercial products such as Pet-Guard that help repel fleas.

Ants. In the home, block the entry of ants with duct tape or petroleum jelly, or use Tanglefoot. Outdoors, pour boiling water down ant colonies and nests you wish to destroy. Wash ant-infested surfaces with soap and water to remove the chemical trails left by ants that lead them to food. Baits such as Drax Ant Kill Gel limit the exposure to humans, pets, and the environment. Ants eat the bait and take it back to the colony, where it is shared. Baits are the best way to kill the egg-laying queen. In addition, deny ants food and water. Store dry foods in airtight containers or in the refrigerator. To protect pet food from ants, place the food bowl inside a larger, water-filled bowl, to create a water barrier from the food.

Sapsuckers. These are common garden pests that suck the sap of plants. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Safer Modes of Pest Control - Pest Control without Toxic Pesticides
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.