The Fateful Day a President Died; BILLY KENNEDY Has Been to Dallas, Texas and Reports Back on a Visit to the School Book Depository from Where the Shots Were Fired Which Killed American President John F Kennedy 37 Years Ago

By Kennedy, Billy | The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), April 20, 2000 | Go to article overview

The Fateful Day a President Died; BILLY KENNEDY Has Been to Dallas, Texas and Reports Back on a Visit to the School Book Depository from Where the Shots Were Fired Which Killed American President John F Kennedy 37 Years Ago


Kennedy, Billy, The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland)


THIRTY seven years on from an event which stunned the world, the Sixth Floor Museum in Dallas, Texas remains a poignant landmark, carefully preserved from the exact moment a President died.

The Sixth Floor building off Dealey Plaza driveway in downtown Dallas is the spot where on November 22, 1963 Lee Harvey Oswald fired the shots which killed United States President John F. Kennedy and seriously injured Texas Governor John Connally.

Today, the Sixth Floor Museum, formerly the Texas School Book Depository, provides educational insights into the life, death and legacy of President Kennedy, and up to a million visitors troop around the building every year on sightseeing tours.

They include many of an age where they have vivid memories of precisely what they were doing on that fateful day, and others much younger who have relied on what they have been told by elders, and what they have read about this chilling assassination.

A visit to Dallas is hardly complete without a tour of ''the Book Store'' and, short of the possibility of bumping into old J. R. on the city streets, it remained a high point in my Texas itinerary, even if it turned out to be a somewhat eerie experience.

The room where officials found a rifle and spent bullet cartridges after the killing is a focal point of interest for the sightseers. Cardboard book cartons of the type used as a sniper's perch for the assassination, are strategically placed in the room, set off by glass to protect the historic flooring, and from intrusion by the gawping hordes.

The arrangement is a close approximation based on film and photographs taken on the day of the shooting. Detectives disturbed the room's lay-out during investigations.

It has never been disputed that Lee Harvey Oswald fired the shots which killed the President, but he never faced trial, having been shot dead two days later by troubled Dallas nightclub owner Jack Ruby as Oswald was being moved from prison by police.

Ruby was immediately taken into custody and stood trial in 1964 for Oswald's murder. He maintained he shot Oswald to spare Jacqueline Kennedy and her small children the ordeal of a trial.

A jury convicted him of murder, but the ruling was later overturned on appeal, based on issues of venue and admission of evidence. Jack Ruby was diagnosed with cancer in 1966 and he died early in 1967 before a re-trial.

Judging by the animated clamour of hundreds of people filing through the now Museum Sixth Floor building, this is clearly a morbid spectacle that will, run, and run.

Museum officials, however, are careful to place the main emphasis in the building on a tribute to John F. Kennedy, who would have been 80 today had he survived.

After the assassination, Dallas engaged in massive re-building programme that completely changed the downtown skyline, but few changes were made to Dealey Plaza. Today, the park, and the old warehouse building that housed the Texas School Book Depository appear much as they did in 1963.

John F. Kennedy was the fourth American President to die from an assassin's bullet. Abraham Lincoln was shot in the head by John Wilkes Booth while attending Ford's Theatre in Washington DC on April. 14, 1865; James A. Garfield was shot in the back by Charles J. Guiteau in Washington DC on July 2, 1881, and William McKinley, an Ulster-Scots President, whose great-grandfather came from Conagher, Ballymoney was shot by Leon Czolgosz at Buffalo, New York on September 6, 1901.

Assassination attempts have been made on various other American Presidents, with the first unsuccessful bid in 1835 on the life of another Ulster Scots President, Andrew Jackson, whose parents emigrated from Boneybefore outside Carrickfergus in 1765, 18 months before Andrew was born.

Kennedy, of southern Irish extraction and America's first Roman Catholic President, was in Dallas as part of a political trip to five major Texas cities. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Fateful Day a President Died; BILLY KENNEDY Has Been to Dallas, Texas and Reports Back on a Visit to the School Book Depository from Where the Shots Were Fired Which Killed American President John F Kennedy 37 Years Ago
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.