New Privacy Act Spurs Web Sites to Oust Children

By Glanz, William | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 20, 2000 | Go to article overview

New Privacy Act Spurs Web Sites to Oust Children


Glanz, William, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Karen DeMars spent last weekend responding to e-mail messages from young customers angry that her teen-driven Internet company planned to delete the accounts of 20,000 children.

Companies like Miss DeMars' ECrush.com Inc., based in San Francisco, are changing the way they do business because of a new national privacy measure that takes effect tomorrow.

The Children's Online Privacy Protection Act is intended to protect the privacy of children younger than 13 by requiring on-line companies to get approval from parents before collecting personal information from them.

Privacy advocates say the new law will help protect children from intrusive marketers seeking personal information, even if children, many of whom are Internet-savvy and have grown up surrounded by technology, don't like the measure.

"Kids are uniquely vulnerable consumers," said Travis Plunkett, legislative director for the District-based Consumer Federation of America.

ECrush.com, which sends e-mail messages on behalf of anonymous suitors who want to meet a particular object of their affection, will delete the accounts of all registered users younger than 13, a decision that met with some disdain from young consumers.

"Kids who are 12 years old have a big problem with people telling them they can't do something," Miss DeMars said.

About 20,000 of the company's 350,000 customers are younger than 13.

New York-based Bolt.com, a Web portal that markets e-mail, voice mail, message boards, instant messaging and wireless services to teen-agers, went a step further and in February prohibited children younger than 15 from becoming registered users, eliminating about 50,000 of its 2.25 million customers.

Teens.com, a teen Web site run by Massachusetts-based W3T.com Inc., has prohibited children younger than 13 from registering on its site since last year.

The privacy law was prompted by a Federal Trade Commission study in 1998 of 1,400 Web sites, including one where children were asked to give their names, street addresses, e-mail addresses and ages.

In one instance, children playing an on-line video game were told that participation required indicating whether they received stocks or bonds for Christmas and listing the value of the investments, FTC Chairman Robert Pitofsky said.

The new law will help keep manipulative marketers from preying on young Internet users, Mr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

New Privacy Act Spurs Web Sites to Oust Children
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.