The Impact on the United Nations of Security Developments in Europe

By Seymour, Jack | UN Chronicle, Winter 1999 | Go to article overview

The Impact on the United Nations of Security Developments in Europe


Seymour, Jack, UN Chronicle


The security relationship between the United Nations and Europe has become more entwined than ever before in the decade since the end of the cold war. What is new in Europe is the emergence of a variety of actual and potential conflict situations that require limited response, as opposed to defense against a massive military threat.

Today's international force in Kosovo and the NATO-led (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) force in Bosnia and Herzegovina operate under UN mandate. The civilian United Nations Mission in Kosovo is led by a French official, appointed by and responsible to the Secretary-General. Earlier, the United Nations conducted, in a veritable combat zone, a humanitarian relief operation in Bosnia, under the protection of a UN-mandated force of 15,000 troops. In addition, a sizeable UN force was deployed as a preventive measure in Macedonia. Such UN operations were unheard of in the days of the cold war when European security was governed by the NATO-Warsaw Pact stand-off.

On-the-ground involvement of the United Nations in a continent which boasts the most sophisticated security alliance in history might seem redundant. Yet, this decade has taught us that security can be jeopardized in many ways short of military attack, and preserving it requires more than military capabilities. The United Nations offers tools and experience in conflict prevention and post-conflict peace-building that can be adapted to European needs today. At the same time, many of Europe's well-developed security institutions may provide lessons or "best practices" for the United Nations itself and for other regions. To make possible such mutual benefit however, it is urgent to develop effective communication and information exchange among the several European security institutions and between them and the United Nations.

Despite the frictions and unseemly polemics which have sometimes characterized early cooperative efforts with the United Nations, considerable progress has been made in Bosnia. Post-conflict operations in Kosovo may also benefit from a clear commitment to work together among the several institutions involved.

Among European security institutions, NATO is clearly the foundation, the chief forum for discussions about developing crises and for military planning and operations to deal with them. However, a number of other organizations also have important roles to play, especially in preventing or defusing crises and in the repair or renewal of civil society after a conflict has ended. Across a spectrum, from military through political to economic focus, they include the Western European Union (WEU), the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), the Council of Europe, the European Union (EU), and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Each has its own founding history, purpose and membership, although there is overlap among them. Many countries in and outside Europe belong to or are affiliated with two or more of these institutions. All have undergone considerable change in facing the challenges that have pressed Europe since the end of the cold war.

NATO has admitted three new members from central and eastern Europe and has developed partnership relations with a number of countries of the former Soviet bloc. It has also adapted from a defensive mode to one capable of mounting limited peacemaking operations. Earlier in the decade, NATO could hardly conceive of such engagement to the point where a NATO spokesman admitted privately that involvement in Bosnia would be "the end of NATO".

The EU has now begun to think of itself as an instrument to promote security in a broad sense. It has already admitted three new members from northern and central Europe, is negotiating with six more aspirants and will likely expand that list soon. The mere possibility of EU membership has inspired several States in Europe to resolve potential disputes. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Impact on the United Nations of Security Developments in Europe
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.